Alexander of Hierapolis

Biography

Alexander was bishop of Hierapolis (Phrygia). He participated in the Council of Ephesus in 431 where he sided with Nestorius against Cyril of Alexandria. When John of Antioch, leader of the Nestorian party, decided to sign the Act of Union in 433, he did not accept it. He died in 434, in exile in Egypt. There are twenty-three extant letters of his relating to the controversy (CPG 6392-6431).

Similar authors

Aelred of Rievaulx (1109 ? - ?)

Moine et abbé cistercien, né à Hexham.
Elevé à la cour du roi David d'Ecosse (1124-1133), reçoit une instruction solide.
Entre en 1135 à l'abbaye de Rievaulx, filiale de Clairvaux, dont il deviendra abbé en 1146.
Très marqué par saint Augustin.
Vénéré comme un saint au Moyen Age.
A écrit des ouvrages historiques et spirituels, très personnels, pleins de charme et riches d'enseignements : Le Miroir de la Charité, Traité de l'institution des recluses.

Details
Ambrose of Milan (339 - ?)

Born in Trier around 340, son of the praetorian prefect of the Gauls, Ambrose was still a catechumen when he was abruptly transferred from the post of governor of Liguria and Emilia to the episcopal seat of Milan, which he occupied until his death on 4 April 397. Entirely devoted to his pastoral duties, he put his erudition and talents at the service of the faith and of the Church. It was through him that Alexandrian theology and exegesis were assimilated into the Latin-speaking Church. By his preaching, he helped Augustine find the way to faith and baptized him in 387. He is also the originator of the liturgical hymn. He is one of the four major Fathers of the Latin Church: his considerable corpus (Scriptural exegesis, dogmatic treatises, treatises on spirituality, preaching, correspondence) is a first-rate source of information about political and religious life in the last quarter of the fourth century within the Western Roman Empire.

Details
Amedeus episcopus Lausannensis (1110 ? - ?)

Amédée est né vers 1110 au château de Chatte, il appartenait à la maison de Clermont. Son père entre à l'abbaye de Bonnevaux avec son fils qui n'avait pas encore atteint l'âge de dix ans.
En 1125, Amédée commence son noviciat à Clairvaux sous la direction de saint Bernard, et en 1139, il est nommé abbé d'Hautecombe. Mais, en 1144, il doit renoncer à cette fonction pour accepter celle d'évêque de Lausanne.
Aux tâches qui concernent l'administration de son diocèse s'ajoutèrent des missions particulières qui firent participer Amédée à la politique de l'époque. À plusieurs reprises, il accompagne l'empereur (Spire 1146 et 1154, Besançon 1153, Worms 1154) et assiste aux diètes impériales (Roncaille 1158).
La date exacte de sa mort, longtemps controversée, a été fixée par les historiens au 27 août 1159.
Ses Huits homélies mariales (SC 72) célèbrent les mystères et les gloires de Marie, avec éloquence et élégance, dans la ligne d'une belle théologie mystique.

Details
Anselm of Canterbury (1033 ? - ?)

Born in Aosta in 1033 or 1034, Anselm left his homeland to go to France. He moved to Normandy and entered the Abbey of Bec at the age of twenty-seven, where he studied under the direction of Lanfranc, the future archbishop of Canterbury. Having become Abbot of Bec in 1079, despite his disinclination to exercise authority, he was soon called by Lanfranc to England, where he stayed several times, to settle temporal affairs and to carry out religious tasks. He was called upon to succeed Lanfranc in the see of Canterbury on the latter’s death in 1089, in a politically troubled period. At that time, William Rufus of England, successor to William the Conqueror, was prolonging and intensifying his predecessors’ policy of abasing and plundering the Church. Yet it was the sick king who begged Anselm to leave his abbey of Bec and take possession of the see of Canterbury. Anselm accepted, only on certain conditions, in 1093. He intended to go to Rome to discuss with the legitimate Pope Urban II the reform of the Church in England. The king let him go, but prevented his return. This exile would continue in Lyon until the death of William Rufus. Anselm then returned to England in October 1100 at the call of King Henry Beauclerc. The latter wanted to keep the royal investiture of prelates and soon opposed Anselm. The king managed to convince him to go to Rome to obtain from the Pope what he could not obtain through other diplomatic missions. It was a ruse to drive Anselm away, who thus found himself in a second "exile". The kingdom's difficulties once again provoked his recall to Canterbury in September 1106. Anselm died in April 1109.

Details
Anselm of Havelberg (1100 ? - ?)

Born in some part of Europe around 1100, Anselm studied in Laon, receiving a solid education in theology, philosophy, canon law and patristics, and gaining a good knowledge of Greek. He was one of the first disciples of Saint Norbert, who consecrated him Bishop of Havelberg (Brandenburg) in 1129. He knew St. Bernard; he stayed several times at the imperial court and was sent on a diplomatic mission to Constantinople by Emperor Lothair II, where he took part in two discussions with authorities in the Greek Church. Returning to Italy from his second mission to Constantinople in 1155, he was appointed Archbishop of Ravenna following an intervention by Emperor Frederick Barbarossa. He died in 1158. A politician and a pastor of souls, he is one of the few Latin theologians to have had real contact with the East.

Details
Aphraates (270 ? - ?)

Aphraate, surnommé "le Sage perse", fut ascète, peut-être évêque, dans la première moitié du 4e siècle. Il est l'auteur de 23 traités, lettres ou homélies composés en syriaque.

Details
Ap[p]onius (400 ? - ?)

Abbot in northern Italy, or perhaps on the outskirts of Rome, his books seem to have been written between 420 and 430. However, there are doubts about his chronology, which some do not hesitate to push back to the middle of the 6th century. He is so far known only through a single work: a Commentary on the Song of Songs, which the editors, B. de Vregille and L. Neyrand, date as early as the first third of the 5th century.

Details
Aristides Atheniensis (50 ? - ?)

Philosophe qui écrit une Apologie adressée à l'empereur Hadrien (117-138).
Elle est la plus ancienne apologie ; nous la connaissons par une traduction syriaque découverte en 1889 et par un fragment arménien.

Details
Athanasius Alexandrinus (295 - ?)

Born in Alexandria around 295, to Greek-speaking and probably pagan parents, Athanasius converted to Christianity at a young age. He wrote in Greek, but had also learned to speak Coptic. His main sources of inspiration are the Greek Bible and the Fathers (Ignatius, Irenaeus, Origen, Athenagoras). He took part in the Council of Nicaea as a deacon and secretary to Alexander, the Bishop of Alexandria. Upon the death of Alexander in 328, Athanasius was unanimously elected to succeed him. A champion of orthodoxy in the struggle against Arianism, he was forced five times to flee into exile and was condemned by ecclesiastical synods or by philo-Arian emperors. He died in 373.

Details
Athenagoras Atheniensis (133 ? - ?)

Christian philosopher from Athens. One thing certain about him (according to Methodius of Olympus) is that shortly before 180, he wrote an apology for the Christian faith entitled The Embassy for the  Christians addressed to the emperors Marcus Aurelius and Commodus. He is also credited with a treatise On the Resurrection of the Dead, transmitted under his name by the same manuscript Parisinus graecus 451, but some historians dispute his authorship. He may have been born around 130 and may have died towards the end of the second century, but these are only conjectures inferred from the sole mention of his Embassy by Methodius.

Details
Augustinus episcopus Hipponensis (354 - ?)

Born in 354, Augustine went through a stormy youth. After a period as a Manichaean, this son of Saint Monica heard the sermons of Saint Ambrose in Milan and converted to Christianity. In 396, he became Bishop of Hippo in North Africa (on the border between Algeria and Tunisia). He died in 430. Of all patristic authors, he has left the greatest body of writings: more than 800 sermons, some 300 letters and a hundred or so treatises.

Details
Alcimus Auitus episcopus Viennensis (450 ? - ?)

Related to the poet Sidonius Apollinaris, bishop of Clermont, Avitus belonged to a family of the great patrician aristocracy. Born in Vienne (Isère) around 450, of Christian parents, he was baptized by Bishop Mamertus, to whom he was (after his father) the successor, from about 490 until his death (518). He was effectively the Bishop of the Burgundian kingdom and its link to the papacy. A defender of the Catholic faith against Arianism, he failed to bring King Gundobad back to orthodoxy. He was nevertheless an influential advisor to the king, whose son Sigismund he succeeded in converting.

Details
Barsanuphius (450 ? - ?)

The life of Barsanuphius, in the 5th and early 6th century, is not well known to us. Born perhaps around 450, he was a hermit near a monastery in the Gaza region, nicknamed "the Grand Old Man". Consulted by people from all walks of age, he left a large correspondence, linked to that of John of Gaza. Dorothea of Gaza and Dosithea are among his disciples. He may have died around 540, according to the Ecclesiastical History of Evagrius Scholasticus.

Details
Basil of Caesarea (330 ? - ?)

Basil was born into a noble and wealthy family which had been Christian for several generations. His paternal grandmother was Saint Macrina the Elder and his mother, Emmelia, was the daughter of a martyr. He received a Christian education and followed the teachings of his father Basil, the famous rhetorician of Neocaesarea. He studied rhetoric in Caesarea, Constantinople and (after 351) in Athens, where he became closely acquainted with Gregory of Nazianzus. When his father died in 358, he retired to solitude near Neocaesarea, where companions joined him and shared the cenobitic life with him. He founded several monasteries. Ordained a priest around 364, on the death of Eusebius in 370 Basil was elected to be Bishop of Caesarea, Metropolitan of Cappadocia and exarch of the civil diocese of Pontus. He created hospitals and hospices, and above all a veritable hospital-city, the Basiliad. He tried to restore the unity of believers and to reunite fully with the West and with the Church of Antioch.

Details
Balduinus de Forda (Cantuariensis) (1125 ? - ?)

Moine, puis abbé du monastère de Ford (Angleterre) en 1175, devient évêque de Worcester en 1180 et bientôt archevêque de Cantorbéry, en 1184.
Il accompagne Richard Coeur de Lion dans sa croisade, au cours de laquelle il mourra. Doué d'une grande générosité, très cultivé, il a laissé une oeuvre importante. Son ouvrage le plus connu est le Traité de la vie commune.

Details
Beda Venerabilis (672 ? - ?)

Bede was born in the north of England, near the Tyne estuary, around 673. At the age of seven, he was entrusted to the Abbot of St Peter's at Wearmouth, near Durham. At about the age of seventeen, he joined the nearby monastery of St Paul of Jarrow. Ordained a deacon at nineteen, a priest at thirty, he remained there until his death in 735, 'finding his happiness in study, teaching and writing', semper aut discere aut docere aut scribere dulce habui (EH V, 24). He produced a huge corpus on a wide variety of subjects - scriptural and theological exegesis, grammar, Latin prosody and music, hagiography, scientific writings - whose profound unity lies in the conviction that everything is connected in the work of the Creator. His most famous work is the Ecclesiastical History of the English People.

Details
Bernard of Clairvaux (1090 - ?)

Bernard was born around 1090 into a Burgundian aristocratic family. His father was a knight of modest rank and his mother, Aleth of Montbard, was of high lineage. He received a solid literary education from the secular canons of Châtillon-sur-Seine. Around 1112, bringing with him some thirty companions, he entered the Abbey of Cîteaux, founded in 1098 by Robert of Molesme in the desire to return to the strict observance of the Rule of Saint Benedict. In 1115, he was commissioned to found the abbey of Clairvaux, in Champagne, in the Val d'Absinthe. He remained Abbot until his death in 1153.

Details
Callinicus (400 ? - ?)

Callinicos était moine du monastère de Rouphinianes au sud de Chalcédoine depuis au plus tard 426. Disciple et biographe du fondateur saint Hypatios, peu après son décès, vers 447-450.
Des indices dans cet ouvrage laissent penser qu'il était d'origine syrienne. On a étudié les rapports avec la spiritualité du pseudo-Macaire.

Details
Caesarius Arelatensis (470 ? - ?)

Born around 470, Caesarius was first a monk in Lérins, before he was ordained a priest and then Bishop of Arles (in 503). He held the episcopal seat for 40 years, until his death in 542, a period marked by several barbarian invasions. He played an important role in the councils of the Bishops of Provence, over which he presided in Arles (524), Carpentras (527), Orange and Vaison (529), and Marseille (533).

Details
Chromatius episcopus Aquileiensis (340 ? - ?)

Fit partie, dans sa jeunesse, à Aquilée, du groupe Jérôme, Rufin, Népotien, etc. Il devint prêtre et auxiliaire de l'évêque Valérien au concile d'Aquilée de 381. À la mort de Valérien (388), il fut élu son successeur.

Details
Clara Assisiensis (1193 ? - ?)

Son père, du prénom de Favarone, était probablement de la lignée des comtes de Coccorano. Sa mère, Ortolana, serait issue d'une famille noble de Fiume. En 1212, Claire assiste aux prêches de Carême de François d'Assise, de 12 ans son aîné. Enthousiasmée par cette prédication, elle décide de renoncer au monde. Elle quitte sa famille en cachette le soir du dimanche des Rameaux, le 20 mars, en compagnie de l'une de ses tantes, pour rejoindre François et ses compagnons. Ceux-ci lui remettent une tunique de toile grossière et lui coupent les cheveux, en signe de renoncement. Elle se réfugie ensuite au couvent des nonnes bénédictines de San Paolo. Elle résiste aux tentatives de son père, furieux, de la ramener chez elle. Peu après, elle est rejointe par sa sœur cadette, Agnès, puis par d'autres femmes de la noblesse d'Assise. François les installe alors près de la chapelle de San Damiano et leur donne une règle fortement inspirée de celle des Frères mineurs. Ainsi naît l'ordre des Pauvres Dames, ou Clarisses.

Details
Clemens Alexandrinus (150 ? - ?)

Born around 150. Before his conversion as an adult, Clement travelled a lot, eager for knowledge. He settled in Alexandria, where he learnt from Pantaenus. He opened a school where he taught Christianity as a philosophy (but he was not responsible for catechesis, contrary to what has often been said). He had pagan scholars in his audience, not only Christians. He fled to Cappadocia during the persecution of Septimius Severus (202-203). He probably died around 215-216.

Details
Clemens Romanus (50 ? - ?)

Troisième successeur de saint Pierre, dans les dix dernières années du Ier siècle.

Details
Constantius Lugdunensis (410 ? - ?)

A priest of Lyon in the 5th century, he was commissioned by his bishop Patient, the successor of Eucher, to write the Life of Saint Germain d'Auxerre (SC 112), one of the great bishops of that era. A scholar and poet, he was a friend and perhaps also the teacher of Sidonius Apollinaris.

Details
Cosmas Indicopleustes (480 ? - ?)

Marchand égyptien, sans doute alexandrin, qui se fit moine au Sinaï dans la première moitié du VIe s., l'auteur de la Topographie chrétienne n'est pas vraiment "Indicopleustès" puisqu'il n'a pas voyagé jusqu'en Inde ; le nom même de Cosmas, attesté à partir du XIe s. seulement dans les manuscrits, pourrait simplement venir du mot grec kosmos.

Details
Cyprianus episcopus Carthaginiensis (200 ? - ?)

Born at the beginning of the 3rd century into a pagan Carthaginian family, Cyprian was well educated and converted as an adult. Shortly afterwards, he became a presbyter, and was elected Bishop (246-248).

Details
Cyrillus Alexandrinus (370 ? - ?)

Cyril was born in Egypt between 370 and 380. Nephew of Archbishop Theophilus, he succeeded him in the see of Alexandria in 412, and he remained its Archbishop until his death in 444. In addition to his pastoral duties, he devoted much of his time and his work as a theologian to the fight against skeptics: the Arians first (especially between 424 and 428), and the Nestorians afterwards. He had Nestorius condemned at the Council of Ephesus in 431, with the support of Emperor Theodosius II and the agreement of Bishop Celestine of Rome, and confirmed the validity of the Christological term theotokos (Mother of God) given to the Virgin Mary, which Nestorius disputed. Cyril attempted a reconciliation with the Orientals in 433, which led to a confession of faith (probably written by the Antiochian theologian Theodoret of Cyrus) which he quoted and took up in the Letter Laetentur caeli, a text often considered the true dogmatic fruit of Ephesus.

Details
Cyrillus Hierosolymitanus (315 ? - ?)

Évêque de Jérusalem de 348 ou 350 à sa mort. Consacré par l'’évêque homéen Acace de Césarée, Cyrille se rapproche rapidement du courant homéen, ce qui lui vaut les attaques de ses anciens amis. Déposé par Acace en 357, réhabilité au concile de Séleucie (359), exilé de nouveau lors du concile de Constantinople de 360, il rentre à Jérusalem sous Julien (362) pour perdre encore une fois son siège sous Valens (367) et le retrouver définitivement en 379. En 381, au concile de Constantinople, il est finalement reconnu évêque légitime de Jérusalem. 24 catéchèses nous sont parvenues sous son nom, dont les célèbres Catéchèses mystagogiques (20 à 24).

Details
Defensor Locogiacensis monachus (600 ? - ?)

Moine de l'abbaye bénédictine de Ligugé, il écrit, vers 700, un recueil de citations bibliques et patristiques, le Scintillarum Liber.

Details
Dionysius Alexandrinus (200 ? - ?)

Un important corpus est passé sous le nom de Denys l'Aréopagite, mentionné en Ac 17, 34. L'auteur a peut-être été un chrétien d'origine syrienne qui séjourna à Athènes (influence de Proclus et de Damascius) à la fin du Ve s ou au début du VIe s.

Details
Dhuoda (800 ? - ?)

Dhuoda, of aristocratic origin, married Bernard, Duke of Septimania, on 29 June 824 in the chapel of the palace of Aix. On 29 November 826, she gave birth to a son, William. The mother and child followed Bernard in his postings that the upheavals of the kingdom imposed. Later, Dhuoda settled in Uzès. A second son, Bernard, was born to her on 22 March 841.

Details
Diadochus Photicensis (400 ? - ?)

Évêque de Photicé (Épire), il est mentionné par Photius (Bibl., cod. 231) parmi les Pères du concile de Chalcédoine (451). Le volume de ses Oeuvres spirituelles comprend les Cent chapitres sur la perfection spirituelle, le Sermon pour l'Ascension, la Vision et la Catéchèse.

Details
Didymus Alexandrinus (310 ? - ?)

Didymus was probably born between 310 and 313; he lost his sight at the age of 4 or 5. A prolific writer with a phenomenal memory, he left many works, especially of exegesis, some of which disappeared because of his posthumous condemnation by the Council of Constantinople II in 553 but were recovered in 1941 among the papyri of Tura. A distant disciple of Origen, he became an educator. Jerome and Rufinus were his pupils. He died towards the end of the 4th century.

Details
Dorotheus Gazaeus (480 ? - ?)

Vraisemblablement originaire d'Antioche et issu d'une famille aisée, Dorothée avait reçu une solide formation classique quand il entre vers 525 dans un monastère de Gaza, fondé à la fin du Ve siècle par l'abbé Séridos. Il se fait le disciple de Barsanuphe et Jean. Il devient infirmier en chef de l'hôpital qui avait été construit aux frais de sa famille. A la mort de l'abbé Séridos et de Jean, Dorothée quitte leur monastère pour aller à quelques kilomètres plus au sud en fonder un pour ses propres disciples. Quelques années après sa mort (entre 560 et 580), un moine anonyme rassembla quelques-unes de ses oeuvres : Instructions, Lettres, Sentences.

Details
Ephraem Syrus (306 ? - ?)

Éphrem naquit à Nisibe, à quelque cent kilomètres d'Édesse, de parents chrétiens ; il fonda avec l’évêque du lieu, une école théologique, avant d’être ordonné diacre et d’en devenir le principal animateur. Il quitte sa ville natale envahie par les Perses (363) et va demeurer en territoire romain, à Édesse.
Tout en étant un modèle de vie ascétique et contemplative, il travaillait comme ministre de la parole, professeur qui enseigne ou qui réfute, animateur de la liturgie, chef de la prière et maître de chant, collecteur des offrandes pour les pauvres, pour les malades et les étrangers. Il tomba victime de son dévouement au cours d'une épidémie de peste.

Details
Egeria (Aetheria) (300 ? - ?)

Egeria, a great lady from the West, visited all the holy places of the Christian Near East for three years from 381 onwards. She recounted her pilgrimage in her Travel Diary, written in Latin in Constantinople. Egeria gradually supplanted Etheria as the exact form of the pilgrim's name. Indeed, the tradition (six manuscripts divided into two families) presents it in five different forms: "Egeria," "Eiheria," "Echeria," "Heteria" or "Etheria," but "Egeria" is the only one that occurs in the two textual families.

Details
Eudocia Athenais augusta (400 ? - ?)

D'abord appelée Athénaïs, du nom de sa cité d'origine. Fille du philosophe Léontias, elle reçoit une éducation soignée. Pour des questions d'héritage, elle demande la protection de la soeur de Théodose II, Pulchérie, qui l'introduit à la cour. Elle épouse Théodose en juin 421, après avoir été baptisée par Atticus, patriarche de Constantinople, qui lui donna le nom de Aelia Eudocia. En 423, elle est proclamée Augusta, puis prend le parti de Nestorius contre Cyrille d'Alexandrie. En 438, elle revient d'un pélerinage à Jérusalem avec des reliques de Saint Etienne. En 442, à la suite d'accusations d'infidélité, elle part en exil à Jérusalem, où elle meurt. Elle laisse quelques écrits : un poème en l'honneur de Théodose pour sa victoire sur les Perses, trois livres sur le martyre de Cyprien, un éloge d'Antioche, un discours prononcé dans cette ville, une paraphrase de l'Octateuque et des prophètes Zacharie et Daniel, le complément des Centons homériques de Patricius.

Details
Eugippius (467 ? - ?)

Born perhaps in the area around Aquileia (Northern Italy) around 465, Eugippius, disciple and biographer of Saint Severinus of Noricum († 482), was abbot of the monastery of Castellum Lucullanum near Naples. He was in contact with several influential figures in ecclesiastical circles in the 6th century, such as Fulgentius of Ruspe. He is also the author of an anthology of Augustine's works and of a monastic Rule, a patristic compilation. He died after 533.

Details
Eusebius Caesariensis (265 ? - ?)

Born around 265, Eusebius was a pupil of Pamphilus, himself a disciple of Origen. With Pamphilus, he wrote an Apology for Origen. He fled from the persecutions of Diocletian to the Egyptian desert of Thebaid. Around 313, he became Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine. At the Council of Nicaea, like many in the East, he distrusted the word homoousios. He condemned Arius, but remained in favour of fairly subordinationist expressions of the faith. In Tyre, he subscribed to Athanasius' deposition. Particularly fascinated by Constantine, the Christian Emperor whom he had met in Nicaea, he contributed to the development of the relationship between Church and state within the framework of an empire whose sovereign is favorable to Christianity. He is seen as the first theorist of Byzantine "caesaropapism". A great scholar, having at his disposal the library of Caesarea inherited from Origen, he is the author of many historical, apologetic, exegetical, and dogmatic works. He died most probably in 340.

Details
Evagrius Ponticus (345 ? - ?)

Born around 345 in Ibora in Pontus, he was particularly influenced by Gregory of Nazianzus in philosophical and theological disciplines. After a temporary stay in Constantinople where he had followed Gregory of Nazianzus in 380, and another in Jerusalem with Melania the Elder and Rufinus, he retired permanently to Egypt around 383, first to Nitria, then to the nearby desert of the Cells (Kellia), until about 390. There he met Macarius († 394), the initiator of monastic life in the desert of Scetis (Wadi Natroun). With the Desert Fathers, he acquired the practical wisdom that was transmitted among the monks and of which the Apophthegmata preserve a vivid witness. Because of his links with the Origenist monks and certain aspects of his thinking, especially in the field of Christology, he was condemned by the Council of Constantinople of 553 along with Origen and Didymus the Blind. As a result, only part of his work in Greek has survived (mainly ascetical treatises), and often under other names, the rest having survived in Syriac, Armenian or Georgian.

Details
Facundus episcopus Hermianensis (500 ? - ?)

Bishop of Hermiane in North Africa (South of Byzacene), Facundus is known for his works and the active role he played in the so-called "Three Chapters" quarrel: Theodore of Mopsuestia, Theodoret of Cyrus and Ibas of Edessa. He had been accused of having inspired or professed a doctrine close to Nestorianism and anathematised by an edict of Emperor Justinian in 543. In 547, Facundus came to Constantinople, prepared a memorandum justifying the Three Chapters, and participated in the deliberations of the bishops. Together with Dacius of Milan, he led the opposition in Constantinople. On his return to Africa around 550, he published an important apology in twelve books in favour of Theodore of Mopsuestia, Theodoret of Cyrus and Ibas of Edessa, the Defence of the Three Chapters, a historical and theological work of reference. From Byzacene, where he lived on the run and in hiding, he wrote the pamphlet Contra Mocianum. In 564, he was confined in a monastery in Constantinople. Around 568-569, he wrote a final pamphlet defending the Three Chapters. He died shortly after 571.

Details
Firmus Caesariensis (350 ? - ?)

Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia, Firmus was one of the leaders of the Cyrillian party at the Council of Ephesus (431), in opposition to Nestorius and Antiochene Christology. There remain 45 letters and a homily of his. He died in 439. His letters reveal a cultured man, well-versed in all the resources of rhetoric.

Details
Franciscus Assisiensis (1181 ? - ?)

Francesco di Bernardone, fils d'un riche marchand drapier, mène son enfance puis sa jeunesse dans l'aisance, entouré de nombreux amis de la noblesse. Tenté par le métier des armes, il se retrouve en prison à Pérouse, puis, malade à Spolète, il revient à Assise suite à une vision. Après plusieurs années de vie solitaire et méditative, il rompt avec sa famille et trouve en 1208 sa vocation véritable dans l'évangile de Mt 10, 7-16. Mettant en pratique la plus stricte pauvreté évangélique, son rayonnement personnel attire à lui de nombreux compagnons ; il fonde l'ordre des frères mineurs franciscains.

Details
Gallandus Regniacensis (1000 ? - ?)

A Cistercian monk of Abbey of Reigny (Diocese of Auxerre), founded by Clairvaux, Galand is known only by his name, and by the information that can be drawn from his work. He first belonged to a group of hermits established in the Diocese of Autun, then his community wanted to join Clairvaux and, for health reasons, the monastery was transferred to Reigny in 1134. A contemporary and admirer of Bernard of Clairvaux, he addressed or submitted his works to him. He left us a Book of Parables and a Little Book of Proverbs, intended for the ordinary readership of monks.

Details
Gelasius papa (400 ? - ?)

Pape de 492 à 496, Gélase défendit vigoureusement la primauté du Siège apostolique lors du schisme d'Acace de Constantinople, conséquence de la politique ecclésiastique de l'empereur Zénon. Il combattit le pélagianisme, les manichéens, les survivances païennes (les Lupercales), et maintint fermement la discipline ecclésiastique. Beaucoup de ses décisions passèrent dans les collections canoniques ultérieures. Une lettre à l'empereur Anastase affirme clairement la distinction et l'indépendance mutuelle de l'Église et de l'Empire. Outre ses Lettres, on a de lui des traités théologiques, en particulier un livre Contre Eutychès et Nestorius sur les deux natures du Christ.
Cf. Pierre Thomas CAMELOT, « GÉLASE Ier saint (mort en 496) pape (492-496) », Encyclopædia Universalis [en ligne], consulté le 23 juin 2014. URL : http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/gelase-ier/

Details
Gaufridus Claraevallensis (1120 ? - ?)

Geoffrey, named of Auxerre after his place of origin, was a student and a disciple of Peter Abelard in Paris in 1140, when he heard the sermon of Saint Bernard to the clerics and decided to follow him to Clairvaux, along with many others. He was a special friend of Saint Bernard, who took him as his secretary and a travelling companion during his preaching crusade in Germany. He wrote the account of the miraculous events in the saint’s journey. He compiled the Letters of the Abbot of Clairvaux, of whom he remained the main biographer. He also wrote a biography of the holy bishop Peter of Tarentaise at the request of the General Chapters.

Details
Gertrudis Magna (1256 - ?)

Gertrude (aussi nommée Gertrude la Grande) entre au monastère cistercien d'Helfta à l'âge de cinq ans, où elle passera toute sa vie. Sa « conversion » du 27 janvier 1281 divise sa vie en deux parties à peu près égales, une phase de « ferveur » succédant à une phase de « tiédeur », sa vie mystique profonde à une vie religieuse un peu superficielle. La maladie lui réserve de plus en plus de loisir pour « vaquer au Seigneur », en attendant la rencontre définitive.
Ses textes sont longtemps restés dans l'oubli, mais le XVIe siècle et la « devotio moderna » ont redécouvert sa spiritualité.

Details
Gregorius (Narek) (945 ? - ?)

Son père, devenu veuf, entra dans les ordres et devint évêque ; il avait confié ses enfants au monastère de Narek, où Grégoire resta moine. Instruit dans les lettres et les sciences humaines, il prêcha en expliquant l'Écriture. Œuvre spirituelle et poétique.

Details
Gregorius Nazianzenus (330 ? - ?)

Born around 330 in Nazianzus where his father, Gregory the Elder, was bishop, Gregory met Basil in Caesarea and joined him in 348 or 350 in Athens, where he remained until 358. Returning to Nazianzus, he retired as a monk in Pontus with Basil. Against his better wishes, he became a priest in Nazianzus in 361 or 362. In 372, Basil made him bishop of Sasima, where, dissuaded by Bishop Anthimus, he never set foot. He retired a second time before returning to Nazianzus where he supported, then de facto replaced, his father who died in 374. He became Bishop of the Nicene Church of Constantinople in 379. From this period date the theological discourses 27 to 31 which later earned him the nickname "Theologian". In 381, Gregory presided for a time over the Council of Constantinople; he resigned and returned to Nazianzus. In 383 he retired to Arianzus, where he devoted himself to his Poems (20,000 lines), his 45 Discourses and 246 Letters, as well as to the Letters of Basil. He probably died in Arianzus around 390.

Details
Gregorius Nyssenus (335 ? - ?)

A younger brother of Basil, he is certainly one of the greatest speculative and mystical theologians of the Greek Church. Born around 335, he was greatly influenced by Basil, whom he called his master, and by his sister Macrina, of whom he wrote an uplifting biography. After being a lector in the Church, he decided to pursue a civilian career and became a teacher of rhetoric. But, recalled by his brother Basil, who needed his support in the struggle against Arianism, he was elected Bishop of Nyssa, a town in the metropolitan district of Caesarea, in the autumn of 371. He ran into the Arians who deposed him from his see in 376 and forced him into exile until the death of Emperor Valens in 378. From then on, and even more so following Basil's death shortly afterwards, his fame and influence continued to grow. Assuming Basil's legacy and resuming his struggle against Eunomius' radical Arianism, he was considered one of the main representatives of the Neo-Nicene Orthodox movement. In this capacity, he played a leading role in the Ecumenical Council of Constantinople in 381 and at the synod of 383. He died in 394.

Details
Gregorius Magnus (540 ? - ?)

Gregory was born around 540. At the end of the 6th century, former prefect of the city (around 572-574) from the Senate nobility, he became a monk in Rome, founded monasteries, and represented Pope Pelagius II in Constantinople (579-585) on a difficult mission. He became pope on 3 September 590. A good administrator of the Church's property, he relieved the poor, established the temporal power of the papacy throughout Europe, and worked effectively on the evangelization of the barbarians. In 596 he sent Augustine of Canterbury to Great Britain. A Doctor of the Church, the influence of his writings in the Middle Ages was considerable. He died in 604.

Details
Gregorius Thaumaturgus (210 ? - ?)

Théodore devient Grégoire après son baptême. Il découvre le christianisme, à 14 ans, à la mort de son père, et devient l'élève d'Origène pendant 5 ans, à Césarée de Palestine, alors qu'il partait poursuivre ses études de droit à Beyrouth. A son retour, consacré évêque de Néocésarée, sa ville natale. 5 Vies légendaires (seule celle de Grégoire de Nysse est un peu historique) racontent les miracles qui lui ont valu le nom de Thaumaturge. Après avoir fui les persécutions de Dèce, institue des fêtes en l'honneur des martyrs. Principale oeuvre : Remerciement à Origène : première partie autobiographique, seconde décrivant l'école et l'enseignement d'Origène.

Details
Guerricus abbas Igniacensis (1070 ? - ?)

Chanoine de Tournai, il entre à Clairvaux vers 1120 et devient abbé de Notre-Dame d'Igny en Champagne, vers 1138. 54 de ses sermons sont parvenus jusqu'à nous.

Details
Guigo I Carthusiae majoris prior generalis (1083 - ?)

Guigo the First, the Carthusian, the fifth prior of the Grande-Chartreuse, is considered the legislator of the Carthusian monks.

Details
Guigo II Carthusiae majoris prior generalis (1100 ? - ?)

Prieur de la Grande Chartreuse de 1174 à 1180.

Details
Gulielmus Bituricensis (1120 ? - ?)

Juif converti, devenu diacre, possédant une double culture, juive et chrétienne. On conserve de lui un ouvrage de polémique antijuive, mais aussi, pour une moindre part, antihérétique, intitulé Livre des guerres du Seigneur, ainsi que deux homélies.

Details
Guillelmus abbas S. Theodorici (1085 ? - ?)

William was born no later than 1075 in the vicinity of Liège. After receiving his first education in this city, he went to Rheims after 1091 with Simon, probably his brother. They entered the Benedictine monastery of Saint-Nicaise in Rheims. In 1121, William was elected Abbot of Saint-Thierry, where he remained until 1135. There he played an important role in attempts at reform within Benedictine monasticism, and wrote several treatises (Contemplation, Nature and Dignity of Love, Sacrament of the Altar). The year 1125 marked a turning point in his life: having fallen ill, he was invited by Bernard to come to Clairvaux for treatment. The talks that the two Abbots had at that time on the Song of Songs would be decisive to both for the development of their mystical work. In 1135, William, eager for a more contemplative life, retired to the newly founded Cistercian abbey of Signy (Ardennes). There he completed or composed most of his writings, especially his Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. The theological writings of Abelard and William of Conches, however, forced him to abandon his reserve: he wrote polemical texts against them, and others aiming to present a sound trinitarian faith. In 1144-1145, returning from a long retreat at Mont-Dieu, he dedicated to the Carthusians of that place his most famous text, the Golden Letter, a treatise on spirituality that would be widely disseminated in the monastic world. When he died on September 8, 1148, he left the Life of St. Bernard unfinished.

Details
Hermas pastor (50 ? - ?)

Hermas se donne comme frère du pape Pie Ier.

Details
Hermias Philosophus (410 ? - ?)

An apologist who probably lived in the second half of the 2nd century or at the beginning of the 3rd century (some even place him in the 4th or 5th century), Hermias is the author of the Satire on secular philosophers.

Details
Hesychius Hierosolymitanus (400 ? - ?)

Hesychius, born around the beginning of the 5th century, was a monk before becoming a priest and holding the office of ‘didascal’ (catechist) in Jerusalem. His career as an orator probably began some twenty years before the Council of Ephesus (431). In the Holy City, he met Jerome, Cyril of Alexandria, Melania the Younger, and Peter the Iberian.

Details
Hilarius episcopus Arelatensis (401 ? - ?)

Born around 401, the kinsman and successor of Saint Honoratus († 430), the founder of "Lérins", known for his spiritual influence and the warmth of his personality, Hilary (or Hilarius) stayed with him in Lérins, where he was in charge of the education of the future bishop of Geneva, Salonius, the son of Eucher, himself a future bishop of Lyon. When Honoratus became bishop of Arles in 426/427, he took Hilary with him, but the latter, in love with monastic life – Eucher addressed to him his Praise of the Desert –, soon returned to Lérins. Honoratus came and snatched him from there so that this time he would agree to follow him and stay with him. He succeeded him as Bishop of Arles, working as a pastor and gaining a solid reputation for holiness. He was a friend of Germanus of Auxerre. Apart from the Life of St. Honoratus, a long panegyric sermon that he delivered probably on the first anniversary of the death of his predecessor, his literary work seems to have been sparse. He died about 449.

Details
Hilarius Pictauiensis (310 ? - ?)

Born around 315, from a noble pagan family of Gaul, Hilary, after a good literary and philosophical education, converted and became Bishop of Poitiers in 350. A highly talented preacher, he was the greatest defender of orthodoxy in the West against the Arianism of Saturninus of Arles and Emperor Constantius. Exiled to Phrygia following the Arian synod of Béziers which deposed him in 356, he continued his trinitarian struggle in the East, writing the De Trinitate, the De Synodis and the Books against Constantius. Very active at the Council of Seleucia (359), he was sent back to Gaul in 360, where he resumed the struggle, notably at the Council of Paris in 361 and in Italy around 364. His main exegetical works date from the end of his life, in particular the Commentary on the Psalms.

Details
Hippolytus Romanus (170 ? - ?)

L'auteur appelé Hippolyte de Rome est traditionnellement un prêtre romain, schismatique, mort en martyr avec le pape Pontien en 235 après avoir été exilé en Sardaigne. Mais l'Hippolyte des nombreux commentaires exégétiques (dont celui sur Daniel), du traité Sur le Christ et l'Antichrist, du Contre Noët et du Traité (perdu) sur la Pâque est plutôt un Oriental ayant vécu entre les IIe et IIIe s. Les oeuvres de tonalité plus philosophique, comme la Réfutation de toutes les hérésies (connue aussi selon son titre grec, Elenchos, ou sous le nom de Philosophoumena), seraient quant à elles l'œuvre d'un autre auteur au nom inconnu, romain comme le martyr, si du moins il ne s'agit pas du martyr lui-même. L'identification de l'auteur de la Tradition apostolique est encore plus délicate.

Details
Honoratus Massiliensis (930 ? - ?)

Honorat was the Bishop of Marseille in 490, perhaps since the years 475-480, and was still so at the time of Pope Gelasius (492-496). Probably a monk before being ordained bishop, he was a close relation of Hilary of Arles and lived in his immediate entourage, perhaps even as his secretary: he wrote his Life in the years 475-480. A literate man, gifted with a good secular education, and a prudent theologian, he is a witness to Arlesian education and culture.

Details
Hugo de Balma (a Palma) (1200 ? - ?)

Prieur de la chartreuse de Meyriat en Bugey (Ain), qui a grandement contribué à l'expression d'une théologie cartusienne. A vécu et travaillé au XIIIe siècle. Auteur de la Théologie Mystique.

Details
Hugo a Sancto Victore (1096 ? - ?)

Born around 1096, Hugh of Saint-Victor is one of the most endearing representatives of the Renaissance of the 12th century. Originally from Saxony, trained in Hamersleben, he settled among the regular canons of Saint-Victor, near Paris around 1120 and remained there until his death in 1141. A humanist, exegete, theologian and mystic, he attempted, in the Didascalicon, to make a harmonious synthesis of knowledge, secular and sacred, which is both universal and centered on Christian wisdom. Between his contemporaries Abelard the dialectician and Saint Bernard the Cistercian, Master Hugh managed to find a balance between the human and the divine, which harmonizes the dynamism of reason and the solidity of faith and marries the demands of the intellectual quest with the fervor of love. His abundant work, with its confident and serene tone, profoundly inspired authors as diverse as Richard of Saint-Victor, Peter Lombard, Saint Bonaventure, Jean Gerson, as well as the masters of the devotio moderna.

Details
Idacius episcopus Aquae Flaviae (395 ? - ?)

Hydatius was born around 395 near Xinzo de Limia in Galicia (Spain), into a family of a fairly high social standing. As a child, he travelled to the East, where he met John of Jerusalem, Theophilus and Jerome. In 416, he became a cleric, perhaps even a monk. In 427, he became Bishop of the city of Aquae Flaviae (now Chaves); in that capacity he fought against the Manichaeans and the Priscillians. In 431, he was sent in an embassy to Aetius to ask him to help the Galicians in their constant struggle with the Suevi. In 460, the Suevian Frumarius arrested him in his church and took him into captivity for three months. He died about 470.

Details
Ignatius Antiochenus (35 ? - ?)

Second évêque d'Antioche et responsable de la plus ancienne communauté chrétienne après Jérusalem, il fut arrêté à Antioche (entre 110 et 130) pour être conduit à Rome où il aurait dû subir le martyre, mais on ne sait s'il est arrivé à Rome (simple présomption de Polycarpe et d'Eusèbe). Durant son périple il écrivit des lettres aux Romains, aux Ephésiens, aux Magnésiens, aux Tralliens, aux Smyrniotes, aux Philadelphiens, à Polycarpe, lequel transmet les lettres à son tour aux Philippiens.

Details
Irenaeus Lugdunensis (130 ? - ?)

Originally from Asia Minor, a disciple of Saint Polycarp, he came to the West on an unknown date (before 177) and became the second Bishop of the Church of Lyon, after Saint Pothinus who was martyred in 177. He remained a Bishop until his death, around 200. He had stayed in Rome and, around 190, addressed Victor of Rome to settle the dispute that had arisen over the date on which Easter should be celebrated.

Details
Isaac of Stella (1100 ? - ?)

Born in England around 1100, Isaac spent much of his youth in France (late 1120 - 1130?) to study extensively, probably in Paris and perhaps in Chartres, as well as in Poitiers. In 1147, he became Abbot of Notre-Dame de l’Étoile in Poitou, formerly a monastery of reformist “black monks” and incorporated into the Order of Cîteaux since 1145. At some point during the 1150s, he spent a relatively short time on the island of Ré to participate in the founding of the monastery of Notre-Dame des Châteliers . He was a friend of Thomas Becket and met Bernard de Clairvaux. It is also known that he played the role of an arbiter in patrimonial affairs in his region.

Details
Isidorus Pelusiota (350 ? - ?)

Not much is known about Isidore, except that he was born in Pelusium, a town in the Nile Delta, around 355, and that he spent a large part of his life there. A contemporary of Cyril of Alexandria, with whom he was in contact, Isidore would have left Pelusium for the first time to study rhetoric in Alexandria, before returning to Pelusium to practise as a sophist. Then, after a few years of teaching, he left his homeland a second time to go to the "desert" (Nitria?) to experience monasticism. On his return to Pelusium, he was ordained a priest; he was reportedly entrusted by the Bishop with teaching within the Christian community and in particular the explanation of Scripture. As a result of unrest in the Church of Pelusium, he reportedly retired to a monastery near the city, where he remained until his death (after 435). This retreat did not prevent him from remaining in epistolary relations with many of those who knew him at Pelusium, and many, attracted by his reputation as an ascetic and his knowledge of the scriptures, came to visit him, ask him for advice, to question him on the most diverse subjects. Hence this abundant correspondence – 2000 letters – composed between 393 and 433, often short notes in response to a specific question or advice from a "spiritual director", but also longer letters that resemble small "treatises" on philosophical or exegetical issues, ascetical and moral themes, spiritual and moral renewal of the Church, respect for the commandments and inner virtue. The one whom Nicephorus Callistus presented as a disciple of John Chrysostom, whom he praised and quoted willingly, did not have, conversely, the best relationship with Cyril of Alexandria.

Details
Cassianus abbas Massiliensis (360 ? - ?)

Born around 360, originally from Scythia minor (Dorbroudja) or Southern Gaul (or even Armenia) – the question is still debated –, John Cassian was a monk in Bethlehem, then in Egypt; ordained a deacon by John Chrysostom in Constantinople, he became his advocate to the Pope in Rome. As a priest, he settled in Marseille, where he founded the Abbey of Saint-Victor and a convent for women. He died around 432.

Details
Iohannes Chrysostomus (350 ? - ?)

John Chrysostom, or "John Golden-Mouthed," was born around 350 in Antioch. Once baptized, he met Diodorus, future bishop of Tarsus. Being close to Meletius, the Bishop of Antioch, he was probably appointed a lector in 371, and then, according to the tradition, retired to the surrounding mountains for four years, with an old Syrian monk as his master. He then spent two years alone in a cave, with reading and memorizing the Scriptures as his main occupation. His failing health apparently forced him to return to Antioch, where he was made a deacon by Meletius in 381, and then a priest by Flavian, Meletius’ successor, in 386. He became Bishop of Constantinople in early 398 and was subjected to the hostility of Empress Eudoxia and Theophilus of Alexandria. Following the Synod of the Oak in 403, he was sent into exile, was recalled and then banished for ever, first to Cucuse in Armenia for 3 years. Exhausted, he died on 14 September 407 on the road to Comana, in Pontus.

Details
Iohannes Apameus (400 ? - ?)

Auteur spirituel célèbre en son temps, il a exercé une grande influence sur la théologie syriaque. Sa vie est fort mal connue (confondu parfois avec Jean de Lycopolis) ; antérieur à Philoxène de Mabboug († 523), il semble avoir vécu dans la seconde moitié du IVe siècle ou la première du Ve, et avoir étudié à Alexandrie (intérêt pour les sciences biologiques et médicales). Sa christologie permet de situer son activité littéraire entre les années 430 et 450 et de voir en lui un « pré-chalcédonien sympathisant du courant pro-cyrillien qui se développait alors dans l’École d’Édesse (De Halleux) ».

Details
Iohannes Damascenus (650 ? - ?)

Born around 650 into a Christian family, he succeeded his father for a few years in the financial administration of the Caliph, then retired after 700 to the monastery of St. Sabas, near Jerusalem. Ordained a priest by John, Patriarch of Jerusalem, he defended the use of religious images. He died at an advanced age (in around 750), leaving a huge body of work. Author of the Fount of Wisdom, the Sacra Parallela and liturgical poems, traditionally he marks the end of the patristic era.

Details
Iohannes Beryti episcopus (420 ? - ?)

John is Bishop of Beryte (Beirut); part of his episcopate is dated between 474 and 491. According to the testimony of Zacharias Scholasticus, he is considered to be a Chalcedonian. He helped Rabulas of Samosata found a monastery in the mountains, suppressing magical and necromantic practices.

Details
Iohannes (450 ? - ?)

Born in the second half of the 5th century, he was a hegumen of the monastery of Merosala, then withdrew to the company of Barsanuphius. He was called John "the Prophet." He left a large correspondence, linked to that of Barsanuphius. He died a few weeks after Abbot Seridos, probably around 543-544.

Details
Iohannes Moschus (540 ? - ?)

Né à Damas (ou en Isaurie) vers le milieu du VIe siècle (entre 540 et 550), Jean Moschus, surnommé le «Tempérant » (Eukratas) embrassa très tôt la vie monastique, probablement au monastère de Saint-Théodose, proche de Jérusalem, avant de se retirer à la laure de Pharan, dans le désert de Juda. Il y demeura une dizaine d’années avant d’entreprendre, en compagnie de Sophrone, futur patriarche de Jérusalem, auquel le liait une solide amitié depuis sa jeunesse, une série de grands voyages pour visiter de nombreux monastères et y recueillir les souvenirs des saints moines qui y vivaient. Quittant la Palestine pour l’Égypte, il parcourt les couvents de Thébaïde jusqu’à la Grande Oasis, avant de séjourner dix ans encore au Sinaï, puis de regagner Jérusalem et la Palestine. Il la quitte définitivement en 602, après l’assassinat de l’empereur Maurice par Phocas, gagne la Phénicie et les monastères de Syrie et de Cilicie, puis s’embarque pour Alexandrie où il séjourne encore une dizaine d’années, en combattant avec Sophrone l’hérésie monophysite. Devant la menace d’une invasion perse en Égypte, il décide de partir pour Rome et, en cours de route, visite les monastères de Chypre et de Samos. Arrivé à Rome, il rédige Le Pré spirituel, dédié à Sophrone, qui se chargera de l’éditer après sa mort, survenue à une date incertaine (619? 634?). Selon ses dernières volontés, son corps sera ramené en Palestine par les soins de Sophrone pour être enseveli dans le monastère de Saint-Théodore.

Details
Iohannes Scottus (800 ? - ?)

D'origine irlandaise (ce que signifie son surnom d'"Érigène"), il arriva sur le continent vers 845-847 et vécut longtemps à la cour de Charles le Chauve, où il enseigna les arts libéraux. Féru de grec, il traduisit et annota les oeuvres du Pseudo-Denys, de Maxime le Confesseur et de Grégoire de Nysse. Il étudia aussi Origène et saint Augustin. Ayant une culture assez exceptionnelle pour son temps, il est surtout philosophe et théologien.

Details
Hieronymus presbyter (345 ? - ?)

Born in Stridon (Dalmatia) around 347, he studied in Rome and was converted there. He travelled to Trier, Aquileia, Antioch, Constantinople (where he heard Gregory of Nazianzus); he returned and stayed in Rome, then settled permanently in Bethlehem, where he died in 419 or 420. Thanks to his mastery of Hebrew and Greek, he undertook a profound revision of the Latin text of the Scriptures hitherto in use in the Christian world, first from Greek, then by translating the texts of the Hebrew canon. His work is the origin of the Vulgate. A biblical scholar, exegete, polemicist, and famous letter writer, he left many biblical commentaries. He held in high esteem the exegesis of Origen, of whom he translated into Latin a large number of homilies (on the prophets Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Isaiah, on the Song of Songs, on Luke).

Details
Ionas Aurelianensis (760 ? - ?)

Jonas was probably born around 760 in Aquitaine, where he was raised, educated in the humanities and where he received the tonsure. In the 780s, he was already staying at Charlemagne’s palace. He undertook a trip to Asturias between 783 and 794, probably sent by the sovereign on a fact-finding mission. Jonas was a member of the court of Louis the Pious when he was king of Aquitaine. When Louis became emperor, Jonas remained in Aquitaine as adviser or tutor to his son Pepin. He had to flee in 817. He became Bishop of Orleans in 818 in place of Theodulf, and often played the role of the emperor’s envoy in ecclesiastical disputes. He was very active in the synods of his time, notably at the Council of Paris in 825 in the Iconoclast controversy; at the Paris Council in 829 on the relationship between the powers governing society; at the synod of Worms in 833, at the Council of Thionville in 834 and finally at the synod of Aachen in 836. He devoted the last years of his episcopate to the restoration of his diocese. He died between December 840 and September 843.

Details
Iulianus Vizeliacensis (1085 ? - ?)

Julian, born around 1080/1090, died around 1160/1165, is only known to us by the text of his Sermons (SC 192 and 193), addressed to his brothers, the Benedictine monks of Vezelay, under the government of a great abbot, Pons de Montboissier (1138-1161), who asked Julian to reunite them in a corpus.

Details
Lactantius (240 ? - ?)

Lactantius (Lucius Caecilius Firmianus), from a pagan family, was born in Africa around 250 B.C. A pupil of Arnobius, he became, like his master, a teacher of Latin rhetoric. He acquired a reputation, no doubt quite considerable, since the emperor Diocletian sent him to Nicomedia to teach Latin rhetoric there, between 290 and 300. In 303, when Diocletian's persecution began, Lactantius, apparently a recent convert to Christianity, had to lose his official position. Although he then lived in poverty, it does not seem that he had to suffer personally from the persecution: during this period he remained in Bithynia, where he wrote most of his works.

Details
Leo I papa (390 ? - ?)

Eminent personality, both "guardian of orthodoxy and saviour of Western civilisation", Leo was originally from Etruria (Tuscany). He became a deacon of the Church of Rome around the year 430 and, in time, he acquired an important position there. This prominent role prompted Galla Placidia, who at that time was regent of the Western Empire, to send him to Gaul to resolve a difficult situation. However, Pope Sixtus II died that same summer, and it was precisely Leo who was called to succeed him, and he received the news of this while he was carrying out his peacemaking mission in Gaul. The new pope returned to Rome and was consecrated on 29 September 440, beginning a pontificate that would last more than twenty-one years and is certainly one of the most important in the history of the Church. Upon his death on 10 November 461, the Pope was buried near the tomb of St. Peter. His relics have been preserved until today in one of the altars of the Vatican Basilica. He was proclaimed Doctor of the Church by Benedict XIV.

Details
Leontius Presbyter Constantinopolitanus (500 ? - ?)

Auteur inconnu par ailleurs. Pas dans la CPG

Details
Manuel II Paleologus (1350 - ?)

Son of John V Palaeologus and Helena Cantacuzene, Manuel II was born in 1350 and received a meticulous education. Governor of Thessalonica in 1369, hostage in Venice in 1370, rival of his older brother Andronic, temporarily vassal at the court of Bajazet I (Bayezid), he became emperor of Byzantium in 1391, which he defended by appealing first to the king of Hungary, then to the pope and the king of France. In 1399-1402, he went himself to Italy, France and England to ask for help against the Turks. After Tamerlane's victory over Bajazet at Ankara in 1402, he returned to Constantinople and skilfully manoeuvred a few years of tranquillity for the dying empire. In 1422, suffering from hemiplegia, he abdicated in favour of his son John and died on 21 July 1425.

Details
Marcus eremita (350 ? - ?)

Auteur de six opuscules ascétiques et de deux opuscules christologiques, Marc n'est pas connu autrement qu'à travers son œuvre. On peut déduire de la lecture de ses œuvres qu'il était moine dans une cité épiscopale de second rang en Asie Mineure au cours du premier tiers du Ve siècle.

Details
Marius Victorinus (275 ? - ?)

Originally from Africa, where he was born around 280, Victorinus lived in Rome from 350, when the emperor Constantius, who was favourable to the Arians, became sole ruler of the West. A famous rhetorician and philosopher (he even had his statue in the Forum), he converted at a late age (see Augustine, Conf. VIII, 2, 3-5) and requested baptism not long before St. Augustine. He gave up his teaching post in rhetoric when, in 362, the Emperor Julian forbade Christian teachers to give lessons. Nothing more is known about him after this date.

Details
Maximus Confessor (580 ? - ?)

Born around 580. According to a recently discovered ancient Syriac Life (late 7th century), Maximus was not born in Constantinople to an aristocratic family joined to that of the Emperor Heraclius, whom he would serve as first secretary before becoming a monk, as was traditionally accepted on the basis of later Lives, but he was rather of Palestinian and much more modest origin. Born of a Samaritan and a Christian Persian slave, he seems to have been entrusted at a very young age to the abbot of a Palestinian monastery, which he had to leave after the Persians took Jerusalem (614), to find refuge in a monastery in Constantinople. It was there that, through his disciple Anastasius, he would have come into contact with the imperial court. The attacks of the Persians and the Avars against Constantinople in 626 forced him to abandon his monastery and find refuge in Africa, near Carthage, where he met Sophronius, the future patriarch of Jerusalem, a determined opponent of monoenergism and monothelitism, as he himself would be in the debates that would pit him against the patriarch Sergius of Constantinople and his successor Pyrrhus, and soon against the imperial power. Alongside Pope Martin I, he took part in the Lateran Council in 649 to defend the two "energies" and the two wills - human and divine - of Christ against the edict of Emperor Constans II, who was in favour of monothelitism. His vigorous opposition to heresy led to his arrest and that of Pope Martin. Taken prisoner in Constantinople, he was tried there and sentenced to exile. Finally, tortured and mutilated, he died in Colchis (Asia Minor) on 13 August 662.

Details
Melito Sardianus (100 ? - ?)

Méliton fut évêque de Sardes (en Asie mineure) au IIe s. Son oeuvre littéraire n'a longtemps été connue que par des fragments, auxquels s'ajoutent maintenant des textes conservés sur papyrus et des traductions abrégées en latin, syriaque et copte.

Details
Methodius Olympius (200 ? - ?)

Sans doute évêque d'Olympe (en Lycie) et martyr mort en Eubée en 311, Méthode est l'auteur d'un dialogue imité de l'oeuvre célèbre de Platon, le Banquet (SC 95). Plusieurs oeuvres sont conservées en traduction slave : l'Aglaophon (ou Sur la résurrection), Sur le libre-arbitre et De la vie et de l'action raisonnable.

Details
Nersès Šnorhali (1102 - ?)

Il a vécu la période tragique où son pays fut envahi et ravagé par les Turcs Seldjoucides. Issu d'une illustre famille, se rattachant selon la tradition à S. Grégoire l’Illuminateur (IIIe-IVe s.), il succède en 1166 comme patriarche de l’Arménie Cilicienne à son frère Grigoris III, qui lui avait conféré le sacerdoce et en avait fait son secrétaire pour les affaires du Patriarcat. Il déploya d’importants efforts pour rétablir l’unité entre l’Église d’Arménie et celle de Constantinople, que sa mort seule semble avoir empêché d’aboutir. Musicien et poète, auteur d'hymnes liturgiques, de commentaires scripturaires, de lettres et surtout de nombreux poèmes.

Details
Nicetas (1005 ? - ?)

Born around the year 1000, Nicetas was a monk of the monastery of Studios, near Constantinople, where he became hegumen towards the end of his life, dying around 1090. He is known for his biography of Simeon the New Theologian (949-1022) and his participation in the Greco-Latin controversy in 1054, when the famous Cardinal Humbert was present in Constantinople. It seems that not only was Nicetas moderate in this controversy, but he does not deserve his reputation as a fierce enemy of the Latins.

Details
Nicolaus Cabasilas (1320 ? - ?)

Born in Thessalonica around 1320 and dying after 1391, Nicholas was the nephew of Nilus Cabasilas, archbishop of the city. Frequenting hesychastic circles, he began his studies in Thessalonica and continued them in Constantinople. He took part in political life under John V Palaeologus and John VI Cantacuzene until 1354. His elevation to the seat of Thessalonica is a legend; he remained a layman. His main works are two treatises on spiritual theology, Life in Christ and the Interpretation of the Divine Liturgy. Nicholas is also the author of numerous homilies, a Prayer to Jesus Christ, and some secular eulogies of sovereigns. Eighteen of his letters are still preserved.

Details
Nilus Ancyranus (350 ? - ?)

An ascetic writer, who lived in the region of present-day Ancyra at the turn of the 4th and 5th centuries, perhaps close to John Chrysostom, Nilus probably died around 430, before the Council of Ephesus, which finds no reflection in his work. He paid little attention to Christological quarrels.

Details
Optatus episcopus Mileuitanus (300 ? - ?)

Optatus, Bishop of Milevis (now Mila, Algeria), who died before 397, wrote six books against Donatism (364- or 366-367), in response to a book by Parmenian, the Donatist Bishop of Carthage.

Details
Origenes (185 ? - ?)

Origen was born around 185, probably in Alexandria. Entrusted with catechesis in Alexandria, he found himself in conflict with the bishop and retired to Caesarea in Palestine in 230, where he spent practically the rest of his life, entirely devoted to the study of the Bible. He made several journeys when called as an expert in various controversies. Considered a great theologian in his time, he was consulted on all sides and always showed a great concern for orthodoxy and fidelity to the Church in his teaching and homilies. He died in Tyre shortly after 250, as a result of the persecution of Decius.

Details
Pacianus episcopus Barcinonensis (290 ? - ?)

The only ancient information at our disposal on Pacian (290/320 - 379/393) is contained in Jerome's De viris inlustribus. Probably coming from a well-to-do family, Pacian had a classical education, and became Bishop of Barcelona; he was married and had a son, Dexter.

Details
Palladius Helenopolitanus (363 ? - ?)

Born in Galatia around 364, Palladius became a monk around 386. Author of the Lausiac History, he spent a few years of monastic life in Palestine, in the circles of Melania the Elder, before going to Egypt, Nitria and then to Kellia where he met Evagrius Ponticus. Around 400, he became bishop of Helenopolis (in Bithynia). Presenting the defence of the exiled John Chrysostom to Pope Innocent I, he was himself exiled in 406 and composed the Dialogue on the Life of Saint John Chrysostom in 408. From Egypt, he finally returned to Galatia, where he may have become Bishop of Aspuna.

Details
Pamphilius Caesariensis (250 ? - ?)

Originaire de Beyrouth, Pamphile de Césarée étudia au Didascalée d’Alexandrie avant de gagner Césarée pour diriger l’école fondée par Origène et développer la bibliothèque attenante. Ordonné prêtre, il fut arrêté lors de la persécution de Maximin Daia et mourut martyr après avoir passé deux ans en prison. C’est en prison qu’il rédigea avec le concours d’Eusèbe une Apologie pour Origène (SC 464 et 465) en six livres, dont seul subsiste le livre I traduit par Rufin (voir Rufin d’Aquilée).

Details
Patricius episcopus Hibernorum (385 ? - ?)

Né en Bretagne insulaire ; son père, qui appartenait à la société romaine chrétienne, était décurion. Patrick avait seize ans quand il fut enlevé par des pirates irlandais qui l'emmenèrent dans leur île ; il y fut employé comme berger pendant six ans. Il réussit à s'enfuir, débarqua en Gaule et se rendit à Auxerre où il étudia sous la direction de saint Germain. Ordonné diacre, il insista pour retourner en Irlande ; il fut alors sacré évêque et débarqua vers 432 dans le nord de l'île, où il exerça son apostolat et où il y avait déjà des chrétiens. Patrick y organisa l'Église en calquant les diocèses sur la division en tribus et en créant des monastères qui jouèrent le rôle de centres d'évangélisation. Il mourut probablement en 461. Son histoire reste néanmoins très complexe, composée d'éléments contradictoires et mêlée de légendes fort difficiles à élucider, mais l'importance de son action dans l'organisation de l'Irlande chrétienne ne peut faire aucun doute.

Details
Paulinus Pellaeus (376 ? - ?)

Born in Pella around 376 in Macedonia, to a father who held important positions in the imperial administration, he spent most of his life in Bordeaux, the homeland of his ancestors (Bazas). This grandson of Ausonius arrived there at the age of three, after a brief passage through Carthage and Rome, which marked stages in his father's career. After 459, he ended his days in Marseille, after a life full of trials, recounted in his Thanksgiving Poem (Eucharisticos) and his Prayer.

Details
Philo Alexandrinus (-20 ? - ?)

Born around 20 B.C., Jewish philosopher and Hellenist, moralist and exegete, Philo was also involved in the life of his city. He maintained direct relations with the imperial court: during the winter of 39/40, he led an embassy to Caligula in Rome to obtain citizenship for the Jews of Alexandria.

Details
Petrus Damianus (1007 - ?)

Ermite camaldule (en 1035, à Fonte Avellana, en Ombrie), puis cardinal évêque d'Ostie, savant juriste, excellent orateur et brillant théologien, joue souvent un rôle de premier plan auprès des papes, des princes, des monastères et des foules.

Details
Petrus Cellensis (1115 ? - ?)

Born at the beginning of the 12th century, Peter Cellensis belonged to a noble family in Champagne, that of Aulnoy-les-Minimes (near Provins). In his youth, he went to Paris to study and there met John of Salisbury, who became his friend. Between 1140 and 1145, Peter became abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Saint-Pierre in Montier-la-Celle (near Troyes). His letters from this period provide us with information about his activities in the abbey. He became friends with Bernard de Clairvaux. Also close to Henry of Beauvais, archbishop of Rheims, in 1162 Peter became abbot of the great monastery Saint-Remi of Rheims. He carried out the embellishment and architectural expansion of the basilica of Saint-Remi. On the death of John of Salisbury (October 1180), who held the episcopal see of Chartres, Peter Cellensis, already old and ill, was chosen to replace him and appointed by the new Pope Lucius III. After only a few months as bishop, he died on 19 February 1183. He is buried in the Abbey of St. Josephat, alongside his friend John of Salisbury.

Details
Macarius (Ps.) (300 - ?)

Il semble bien devoir être identifié avec le moine Syméon de Mésopotamie qui vécut à la fin du IVe et au début du Ve siècle en Mésopotamie et au sud de l’Asie Mineure. Certains aspects de son oeuvre ont conduit à voir en lui un représentant des « messaliens » (ou « euchites »), des ascètes dont toute la pratique ascétique se résumait dans la prière, à l’exclusion du jeûne et du travail des mains, et qui attendaient de la seule prière la réception du Saint-Esprit et la perfection, en niant toute efficacité aux sacrements. Cela explique la condamnation d’une partie de ses écrits au concile d’Éphèse de 431 (et leur transmission fort troublée), bien que son messalianisme paraisse avoir été modéré.
Il a laissé de nombreuses Homélies, remarquables par la doctrine spirituelle, qui ont exercé une forte influence dans les Églises orientales (notamment sur Syméon le Nouveau Théologien), directement ou indirectement par l’intermédiaire de Diadoque de Photicé, et sur certains spirituels russes.

Details
Philo Alexandrinus (Ps.) (1 - ?)

Under the name of Philo are transmitted several inauthentic Jewish works, dating from the 1st century AD, such as the Biblical Antiquities (from Adam to the death of Saul) and two Synagogue Preachings (On Jonah and On Samson).

Details
Ptolemaeus Gnosticus (100 ? - ?)

Ptolemy was a teacher active in Rome in the 2nd century (until 180?). He may have died a martyr's death, if he is to be identified with a Ptolemy mentioned by Justin. He is the author of a Letter to Flora preserved by the heresiologist Epiphanius of Salamis (Panarion 33, 3-7). As a Gnostic, he is considered to be a representative of the western branch of the Valentinian school and the one whose doctrine is explained by Irenaeus (Adversus haereses I, 1-9).

Details
Quoduultdeus episcopus Carthaginiensis (428 - ?)

Born towards the end of the 4th century, Quodvultdeus was deacon in Carthage in 421 when he asked Augustine about heresies; the latter sent him the De haeresibus. Quodvultdeus became bishop of Carthage, perhaps in 437. During the Vandal invasion in 439, he left for Naples, where he died before 454. An author of sermons, whose authenticity is disputed, we owe him the Book of God's Promises and Sermons (SC 101 and 102), which are fairly representative of the Western exegesis of that time: a sort of Christian vision of the whole history of humanity and the world read in the Bible, where the Old Testament announces and prefigures the New. Also attributed to him are a series of Sermons against Gentiles, Jews and heretics, on the Creed, on charity, on the misfortunes of the times and the barbarian invasions, and two letters addressed to St. Augustine.

Details
Richardus a S. Victore (1110 ? - ?)

Born around 1110, originally from Scotland, Richard arrived in Paris probably before 1141 and entered the Abbey of St-Victor of the Augustinian Regular Canons, where he became prior from 1162 until his death in 1173. In the conflict between Thomas Becket and King Henry II, he sided with the Archbishop of Canterbury. He is the author of scriptural commentaries, theological treatises, spiritual writings and pamphlets, sermons and letters, the chronology of which is difficult to establish.

Details
Richardus Rolle (1300 ? - ?)

Richard Rolle a fait des études à Oxford.
À l'âge de dix-neuf ans, il abandonne la maison paternelle et revêt la bure d'ermite.
Pendant plusieurs années, il habite dans le comté de Richmond (Yorkshire) comme ermite et prédicateur ; il y fut en relation spirituelle avec une recluse d'Anderby, Marguerite Kirkby, à laquelle il adresse sa « Form of Perfect Living » et son commentaire anglais du psautier.
Il passa ses dernières années près du monastère des Cisterciennes de Hampole, non loin de Doncaster. C'est là qu'il meurt, victime de la peste noire.
Pour lui, le sommet de la vie mystique consiste dans la mise à l'unisson de l'âme et de la mélodie des sphères célestes.

Details
Romanos Melodos (493 ? - ?)

Romanos, the famous hymnographer, was born towards the end of the 5th century (493?) in Emesa to a family of Jewish origin. He was a deacon in Beirut, before settling in Constantinople during the reign of Anastasius I (491-518); it was there, in the church of the Theotokos, that the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to him in a dream and given him the poetic talent that would establish his reputation as a composer of kontakia (a kind of homily in verse). It seems that he died between 555 and 565. He is the greatest poet of the early Byzantine period.

Details
Rufinus Presbyter (345 ? - ?)

Tyrranius Rufinus was born in Concordia, not far from Aquileia, around 345, and completed his studies in Rome, where he stayed for ten years, becoming well acquainted with Jerome. After a few years in a monastery in Aquileia, he went to Egypt. There he met Melania the Elder, with whom he left for Palestine. He returned to Egypt to attend the school of Didymus and finally returned to Palestine around 380 to found a monastery. In 397, he moved to Rome and, in 401, to Aquileia, where he devoted himself to translating the works of Origen to defend him against accusations of heresy. Fleeing the Goths, he arrived in Sicily around 410, where he died.

Details
Rupertus abbas Tiiensis (1075 ? - ?)

Bénédictin, moine au monastère Saint-Laurent, près de Liège, termina sa vie comme abbé du monastère de Deutz, aux environs de Cologne ; on nous le représente "plein d'imagination et de vitalité, affectueux et bavard, distrait"... Il commente le déroulement de l'histoire du salut à travers l'analyse des livres historiques de la Bible. On peut rapprocher sa théologie symbolique du développement de l'art roman.

Details
Saluianus presbyter Massiliensis (400 ? - ?)

Originally from Trier (or Cologne), born into a wealthy, even aristocratic family at the beginning of the 5th century, Salvian undoubtedly received there a good education in rhetoric and law. It is not known whether he was a Christian by birth. After his marriage to Palladia, born of pagan parents, and her conversion, they decided by mutual agreement to live in continence. After a stay as a monk in Lérins, around 420, where he shared with Hilary of Arles and Vincent of Lérins the task of instructing the sons of Eucher, including Salonius, he became a priest of the Church of Marseille, around 439. We know nothing of his pastoral activity. He died after 470.

Details
Socrates scholasticus Constantinopolitanus (380 ? - ?)

Along with Eusebius of Caesarea, Sozomen and Evagrius Scholasticus, Socrates of Constantinople is one of the great historians of Christian antiquity. Little is known about him, except that he was born around 380-390 in Constantinople, where he grew up and lived until his death, dated sometime between 439, the last year he describes in his work, and 450, the date of the death of Theodosius II, of whom he always speaks as if the latter were still alive. His knowledge of theology and his interest in liturgical questions suggest that he was a cleric. Despite the epithet “Scholasticus” (lawyer) given to Socrates in some manuscripts, there is no evidence that he was a jurist or that he had any particular knowledge in this field, unlike Sozomen.

Details
Sozomenus (370 ? - ?)

Sozomen (c. 380 - c. 450), a Greek-speaking Christian rhetorician and historian who was born in Palestine, composed an Ecclesiastical History from 323 to 425, which continues that of Eusebius of Caesarea and depends on other Byzantine chroniclers such as Socrates.

Details
Sulpicius Severus (363 ? - ?)

A friend of Paulinus of Nola (355-431), who came like him from the Aquitaine aristocracy, Sulpicius Severus was born around 363, and died around 420. It is likely that he studied law in Bordeaux and became a lawyer. After the death of his wife (399), he led a monastic life in Primuliacum (probably between Toulouse and Narbonne) until his death. Attracted by the fame of Saint Martin, he made the pilgrimage to Tours. He is best known for his Life of Saint Martin, which he wrote even before the death of the Bishop of Tours (November 397). It was a great success among his contemporaries. In his two books of Dialogues on the Virtues of Saint Martin, he undertook to defend, around 404, the memory of Martin against his detractors. He is also the author of the Chronicle (after 400), a sacred history of the world since its creation which ends with an account of the Priscillian heresy, a work to which the Reformers of the 16th century, attracted by the ascetical ideas of the author, brought renewed attention.

Details
Symeon Neotheologus (949 - ?)

The life of Simeon the New Theologian is well known to us thanks to Nicetas Stethatos, who was at the same time his disciple, his biographer and the publisher of his works.

Details
Symeon Studites (920 ? - ?)

Almost nothing is known about Simeon the Studite (920? - 987?), except that he was the spiritual master of Simeon the New Theologian (949-1022), some thirty years his junior, at the Monastery of Studios (Constantinople). The community of thought between disciple and master was so great that thirty-two chapters of the Ascetical Discourse (out of forty-one) were long attributed to the New Theologian. He does not seem to have been a rigorist in the ascetical field, but to have favoured the ways of humility, simplicity and prayer to attain mystical experience and obtain the visions of divine light which he himself is said to have received. His reputation for mysticism earned him the epithet "Pious".

Details
Tertullianus (155 ? - ?)

Born a pagan in Carthage around 160, he studied law and rhetoric in Rome and converted, probably in the last decade of the 2nd century, before returning to his homeland. His work marks the birth of Christian literature in the Latin language. An uncompromising character with an impassioned spirit, he separated from the Church around 206-207 to join the Montanists and then to create the sect of the Tertullianists. An apologist who was almost always polemical, a moralist, a scholarly writer, an orator, also fluent in Greek, he possessed a perfect command of the Latin language and considerably enriched the Christian vocabulary. Thirty-one of his works have come down to us: treatises related to the persecution of the nascent African Church; apologetic works, polemical and doctrinal writings, particularly the Against Marcion, a vigorous refutation of Marcionism in five books; the Against Praxeas, the first exposition of Trinitarian doctrine; and numerous moral and ascetical treatises or those relating to the Christian life (on baptism, penance, marriage and virginity). He died between 220-235.

Details
Theodoretus episcopus Cyri (393 ? - ?)

Theodoret was born in Antioch around 393. At the age of 23, he became a monk in the monastery of Nicerte, near Apamea. Appointed bishop of Cyrus (near present-day Turkey) in 423, he was concerned about the heretics of his diocese, then became, at the request of John of Antioch, one of the main adversaries of Cyril of Alexandria at the outbreak of the Nestorian crisis. Present at the Council of Ephesus which condemned and deposed Nestorius, he was one of the architects of the Act of Union (433) which restored communion between Antioch and Alexandria. After the death of Cyril (444), he resumed the fight to denounce the monophysitism of Eutyches. He was first consigned to his diocese (438), then deposed by the Council of Ephesus in 449 and forced into exile. He then remained withdrawn in his monastery in Nicerte, at least until his rehabilitation by the Council of Chalcedon (451). His death is dated around 460; he left a considerable body of work, as much historical as exegetical and theological.

Details
Theophilus (100 ? - ?)

Syrien d’origine, il est de langue et de culture grecques. Païen converti au christianisme, il devint évêque en 169, selon Eusèbe, qui le donne pour le sixième évêque d’Antioche. Il est l'auteur de Trois livres à Autolycus (SC 20). Ses autres oeuvres (dont un Contre Hermogène et un Contre Marcion) ont disparu.

Details
Victorinus episcopus Poetouionensis (230 ? - ?)

Born around 230, Victorinus, bishop of Pettau (in present-day Slovenia), died a martyr in 304 during the persecution of Diocletian. His life is known mostly thanks to Jerome, who adapted his Commentary on the Revelation of John, the first such commentary we know of (SC 423). Jerome held in high esteem this Latin exegete well-read in Greek authors too (particularly Hippolytus and Origen), even though he did not share his millenarianist ideas; he therefore modified the last chapters of the commentary on Revelation. Victorinus is also the author of a short treatise On the Construction of the World, a typological meditation on the story of creation, and a chronological fragment about the life of Jesus.

Details
Faustinus et Marcellinus (300 ? - ?)

Priests of Roman origin who lived at the end of the 4th century, they authored a plea defending the orthodoxy of the Luciferian current of thought, which they presented to the emperors Valentinian II, Theodosius and Arcadius in 383/384.

Details
Lucifer episcopus Calaritanus (300 ? - ?)

Évêque de Cagliari, en Sardaigne, exilé en Syrie, puis en Palestine, par l’empereur philoarien Constance pour avoir refusé de signer la condamnation d’Athanase au concile de Milan de 355. Profitant des mesures d’amnistie prises par l’empereur Julien en 362, au lieu de participer au concile convoqué par Athanase à Alexandrie et de regagner ensuite son siège, il s’arrête à Antioche où il prend le parti de Paulin contre Mélèce. En consacrant Paulin évêque, il contribua à aggraver le schisme d’Antioche. Son refus de tout compromis avec l’arianisme l’amena à condamner le De synodis d’Hilaire de Poitiers et à prendre ses distances avec Eusèbe de Verceil.
On désigna par la suite sous le nom de « lucifériens », à Rome, des nicéens intransigeants qui refusèrent de rentrer en communion avec le pape Damase, sans que l’on puisse affirmer que Lucifer soit lui-même à l’origine de ce schisme.

Details
Georgius Monachus et Presbyter (600 ? - ?)

Moine et prêtre, hérésiologue et computiste. S'inspire de St Epiphane pour rédiger un traité Sur les hérésies, (en 15 chapitres), depuis les manichéens et les gnostiques valentiniens jusqu'aux agnoètes. Le chapitre le plus intéressant porte sur l'origénisme. L'opuscule sur le calcul de la date de Pâques écrit en 639-640 et dédié à Jean, son frère spirituel, moine et diacre, est le premier témoignage de l'ère byzantine.

Details
Aetius Antiochenus (290 ? - ?)

Syrien formé à la dialectique aristotélicienne à Alexandrie, Aèce est le maître de l'anoméisme, forme radicale de l'arianisme refusant au Fils toute ressemblance avec le Père. Ses ennemis, faisant un jeu de mots avec son nom, l'appelaient « athée » (atheos au lieu de Aetios). Ordonné diacre à Antioche vers 355, celui qui avait Eunome pour disciple fut condamné en 360 lors du Concile de Constantinople. Rappelé par Julien en 362, il est consacré évêque de la communauté anoméenne d'Antioche, rivale de celles, ariennes modérées, d'Eudoxe et d'Euzoïus. Il meurt vers 365. Son Syntagmation nous a été conservé par Epiphane (Haer. 76, 11), qui précise qu'il aurait écrit 300 dissertations théologiques.

Details
Nemesius Emesenus (350 ? - ?)

Evêque d'Emèse en Syrie à la fin du IVe siècle, il rédige vers l'an 400 le De natura hominis.

Details
Epiphanius Constantiensis (Salamiensis, Cypriota) (315 ? - ?)

Moine en Egypte durant sa jeunesse, il fonde en Judée un monastère dont il prend la tête, avant de devenir évêque de Constantia-Salamine (Chypre) en 365. Il est connu surtout pour son œuvre hérésiologique et polémique (Ancoratus, Panarion) ; quelques autres textes nous sont parvenus à l'état fragmentaire (Des poids et mesures, Sur les douze gemmes, Lettres, Commentaires sur la sainte Ecriture).

Details
Severianus Gabalensis (370 ? - ?)

On ne connaît de sa vie que les années passées à Constantinople, où il arrive en 400. Il y fit une carrière de brillant prédicateur.Vicaire de Chrysostome en 401, lorsque ce dernier part à Ephèse, sa nature intrigeante et les incidents qui en découlèrent conduisirent à une brouille puis une réconciliation. Mais en 403, lors du synode du Chêne, Sévérien siège parmi les accusateurs de l'archevêque. Ironie du sort ? Ses oeuvres - une cinquantaine d'homélies - furent mises au VIe siècle sous le nom de Chrysostome, rendant difficile le repérage de son patrimoine littéraire.

Details
Hadrianus exegeta (400 ? - ?)

Exégète grec du Ve siècle. Moine ou prêtre ? Une Introduction aux Ecritures divines est transmise sous son nom (PG 98, 1273-1612), selon la méthode des exégètes de l'Ecole d'Antioche.

Details
Eutherius Tyanensis (370 ? - ?)

Born before 400, metropolitan bishop of Tyana in Second Cappadocia, Eutherius, at the Council of Ephesus (431) took the side of Nestorius and John of Antioch, and vigorously opposed Cyril of Alexandria. Refusing the Act of Union in 433, he was exiled to Scythopolis, whence he escaped to Tyre to join Irenaeus, a former imperial official who had become a bishop and remained faithful to the Antiochian cause. His Antilogia (Protest, SC 557), composed around 432, attacked Cyril's proposals, as well as the 5 letters under his name in a Latin version of the conciliar acts. The date of Eutherius' death after 441 is not known. His writings, very representative of the most virulent Nestorianism, are important for the history of the Nestorian controversy.

Details
Sophronius Hierosolymitanus (550 ? - ?)

Né vers 550 à Damas, il est peut-être maître de rhétorique (d'où une identification possible avec Sophrone le Sophiste) avant de devenir moine au monastère de St Théodose, près de Jérusalem. A partir de 633, il combat les monothélites et Serge de Constantinople ; il voyage en Egypte, Syrie, Italie et achève sa carrière comme évêque de Jérusalem, en 634. Il est l'auteur d'une lettre synodale défendant la doctrine des deux énergies dans le Christ. Son oeuvre comporte des écrits hagiographiques, onze homélies et vingt-trois odes anachréontiques.

Details
Iustinus martyr (100 ? - ?)

Born around 100 in Nablus, as a pagan Justin was interested in philosophy. His search for truth led him successively to the Stoic, Aristotelian, Pythagorean and Platonist schools and finally to Christianity: he converted between 132-135, probably in Asia Minor. He went to Rome where he taught Christianity as philosophy. He was martyred there, probably in 165. Of his many writings there remain the Apology for Christians and the Dialogue with Trypho. The treatise on the resurrection attributed to him is of disputed authenticity.

Details
Polycarpus Smyrnensis (69 ? - ?)

La vie du premier évêque de Smyrne, ami de l'apôtre Jean, est connue principalement grâce aux écrits de son disciple Irénée, futur évêque de Lyon. Ignace d’'Antioche lui dédie une épître. Il mourut martyr vers 156.

Details
Philoxenus Mabbugensis (440 ? - ?)

Né en Perse vers le milieu du Ve siècle, il étudie à Édesse (avant 457) où, sans être moine, il s’initie à l’ascèse monastique. C’est dans les monastères de la Mésopotamie septentrionale, des environs d’Antioche jusqu’aux bords du Tigre, qu’il prononça ses Homélies, composées probablement durant son épiscopat. Adversaire résolu du nestorianisme, Philoxène soutint les thèses monophysites avec une vigueur telle qu’il entra en conflit avec le patriarche d’Antioche Calendion, dont il obtint de l’empereur la déposition et le remplacement par un monophysite, Pierre le Foulon. Cela lui valut d’être nommé par lui évêque de Mabboug (Hiérapolis). Durant les trente-quatre années de son épiscopat (485-519), il fit encore déposer le patriarche Flavien et exiler plusieurs évêques fidèles à la foi de Chalcédoine, avant d’être exilé à son tour par l’empereur et de mourir en exil en 523 à Philippopolis de Thrace.

Details
Minucius Felix (100 ? - ?)

Converti du paganisme, il est l'auteur d'un dialogue philosophique, l’Octavius, inspiré des idées de Cicéron et des stoïciens, qui plaide en faveur du monothéisme, de l’immortalité de l’âme, de la perfection morale.

Details
Commodianus (200 ? - ?)

Poète latin chrétien, écrivant en hexamètres.
Dans ses "Instructiones", donna des conseils aux diverses catégories du peuple chrétien (écueils à éviter, droit chemin) et défend la foi chrétienne contre juifs et païens.
Le "Carmen apologeticum" est une réécriture de l'Apocalypse.

Details
Nouatianus presbyter Romanus (200 ? - ?)

Après avoir tenu une place importante dans le clergé, il se sépare de l’Église ; à la tête d’un parti rigoriste, il meurt martyr durant la persécution de Valérien (257-258) ; cf. C. Mondésert – J.-N. Guinot, Lire les pères de l’Église, dans la collection « Sources chrétiennes », Cerf, Paris 20102, p. 46.

Details
Arnobius Siccaensis (240 ? - ?)

Professeur de rhétorique à Sicca Veneria (Numidie), maître de Lactance, il nous a laissé, vers 300, un ouvrage contre les païens, intitulé Aduersus nationes, qui témoigne de sa conversion à la foi chrétienne et nous donne une description très détaillée des religions païennes de son temps.

Details
Victor episcopus Vitensis (440 ? - ?)

Victor fut simple prêtre à Vite, puis nommé évêque à un siège inconnu. Son Historia persecutionis Africanae... constitue une description des persécutions subies par les catholiques en Afrique sous les rois vandales Genséric (428-447) et Hunéric (447-484)

Details
Vigilius episcopus Thapsensis (400 ? - ?)

Participe au colloque entre catholiques et ariens, convoqué par le roi vandale Hunéric, en février 484. Se réfugia peut-être à Constantinople. Auteur d'écrits sous forme de dialogues antiariens, dans lequel il tente de démonter les thèse ariennes selon la rationalité (aucune citation biblique). Il expose la doctrine christologique des catholiques dans "Contra Eutychem".

Details
Fulgentius episcopus Ruspensis (467 ? - ?)

Born perhaps in 467 (or 462?), Fulgentius was procurator of Byzacene, before he became a monk. On his return from a trip to Rome, he became Bishop of Ruspe in 507. His life was troubled by Vandal and Arian persecutions. He died in 532 (or 527).

Details
Victorus episcopus Cartennensis (400 ? - ?)

Pour une biographie et une bibliographie mises à jour, voir la page de l'auteur dans le Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexicon du site allemand Bautz.

Details
Euodius episcopus Vzaliensis (300 ? - ?)

Compatriote, disciple, ami d'Augustin, qui assiste à la mort de Monique.
Evêque d'Uzali, où il fonde un monastère. Il prend une part active dans la lutte contre les donatistes, premier propagateur des reliques de saint Etienne en Afrique.
N'a laissé vraisemblablement aucun écrit (simple correspondance succinte avec Augustin)

Details
Liberatus diaconus Carthaginiensis (500 ? - ?)
Details
Primasius episcopus Hadrumetinus (450 ? - ?)

Un des rares qui se déclare en faveur de l'édit de condamnation des Trois Chapitres. Le "Commentaire de l'Apocalypse", inspiration très épurée d'Augustin et Tyconius (point de vue des allégories : reconnaître dans le texte prophétique les allusions à l'histoire de l'Eglise). Insiste sur les origines de l'Eglise moins que sur les derniers temps (atténuer tension eschatologique).

Details
Diodorus Tarsensis (320 ? - ?)

Antiochien, élève de Sylvain de Tarse et d'Eusèbe d'Emèse, il poursuit ses études à Athènes. Moine puis prêtre d'Antioche, il se range du côté de Mélèce et dirige la communauté mélécienne durant les exils de Mélèce sous Constance puis Valens, jusqu'à être lui-même exilé en Arménie. A la mort de Valens, il est nommé en 378 évêque de Tarse et joue un rôle important au Concile de Constantinople en 381. Considéré après sa mort comme précurseur de Nestorius, il fut condamné avec les trois auteurs visés par les Trois Chapitres. Maître de l'exégèse antiochienne, quasiment tous ses écrits ont disparu. J.-M. Olivier a interrompu l'édition critique de son Commentaire sur les Psaumes (Ps. 1-50, CCG 6, 1980).

Details
Eusebius Emesenus (300 ? - ?)

Né à Edesse vers 300, syrien de souche mais grec de formation, il fut l'élève d'Eusèbe de Césarée et de Patrophile de Scythopolis avant de parfaire sa formation à Antioche et à Alexandrie. Lié au parti eusébien, il refusa pourtant le siège d'Alexandrie qu'on lui proposait. Devenu ensuite évêque d'Emèse, il y mourut avant 359. Jérôme (Vir. ill. 91) mentionne un Contre les juifs, les païens et Novatien, et des Homélies sur l'Evangile. On ne possède que des fragments exégétiques, ainsi que 23 homélies doctrinales en traduction latine.

Details
Marcellus Ancyranus (270 ? - ?)

Présent au concile de Nicée en 325, il soutient Athanase en 335 au concile de Tyr, laors qu'il est déjà âgé. Déposé en 336, il fut condamné en Orient dès 341 comme proche de la doctrine de Sabellius, puis en Occident à partir de 345. Des fragments de ses écrits ont été conservés en particulier par Eusèbe de Césarée.

Details
Theodorus Mopsuestenus (350 ? - ?)

Né sans doute à Antioche vers 350, élève de Diodore de Tarse et sans doute condisciple de Jean Chrysostome, il est moine avant de devenir évêque de Mopsueste (en Cilicie) en 392. Exégète et théologien reconnu jusqu'à sa mort en 428, il fut considéré ultérieurement comme un précurseur de Nestorius : visé par l'un des Trois Chapitres, il fut condamné au concile de Constantinople en 553. De son œuvre, il ne reste que des morceaux, surtout en traduction syriaque, comme les 16 Homélies catéchétiques.

Details
Amphilochius Iconiensis (340 ? - ?)

Ami intime des trois Cappadociens et cousin de Grégoire de Nazianze. Élève de Libanios à Antioche, puis avocat à Constantinople, il se retira bientôt en Cappadoce pour y mener une vie d’ermite, mais Basile le fit nommer évêque d’Iconium, où il gouverna très bien son diocèse (vers 373-374). Sans intérêt particulier pour la spéculation christologique, il consacra surtout ses forces à lutter contre les hérésies : au Concile de Contantinople (381) et dans des synodes locaux contre les macédoniens (Iconium, 376) et les messaliens (Side, 383). De nombreux textes apocryphes ont été publiés sous son nom, ce qui prouve une certaine réputation littéraire.
Il ne nous reste de lui qu’une Lettre synodale (sur le Saint-Esprit), un traité contre divers hérétiques (version copte), une Lettre à Séleucus, en vers ïambiques, texte intéressant pour l’histoire du canon biblique, enfin des Homélies (SC 552-553), dont certaines d’authenticité suspecte, mais intéressantes du point de vue exégétique et doctrinal ; des autres écrits, seulement des titres ou des citations.

Details
Tyconius (300 ? - ?)

Tyconius was a layman who lived in the second half of the fourth century in North Africa. Initially a supporter of the Donatist movement, he was excluded from it following criticism of his co-religionists. His conception of a universal church was too close to the Catholic party. The only surviving work of Tyconius is the Liber regularum, the oldest Latin-language biblical hermeneutics textbook. The Commentary on Revelation, which was more widely distributed, was only transmitted through later exegetes. Augustine, who appreciated him for its intellectual qualities, used his writings and recommended they be read, despite the fact that their author belonged to the Donatist party. His influence also extended to Quodvultdeus, Ambrose and many others as far as Bede the Venerable and beyond.

Details
Ennodius episcopus Ticinensis (474 ? - ?)

Né à Arles, puis évêque de Pavie en 514, il fut envoyé à Constantinople par le pape Hormisdas auprès de l’empereur Anastase pour tenter une réconciliation entre Rome et l’Église byzantine. Il est l’auteur de Poèmes, de Dictiones et de Lettres, intéressantes pour l’histoire de l’Église de Rome et pour la spiritualité.

Details
Eucherius episcopus Lugdunensis (380 ? - ?)

Un des grands évêques de son époque, très cultivé, probablement né à Lyon ; de famille aristocratique, sénateur, père des évêques Veranus (à Vence) et Salonius (à Genève) ; attiré par la spiritualité lérinienne et le renom d’Honorat de Lérins, il séjourna avec sa famille sur l’île Sainte-Marguerite (Lero) jusqu’à son accession à l’épiscopat. Auteur de deux traités exégétiques (Formulae spiritualis intelligentiae, Instructiones), dédiés à ses fils, de deux excellents petits traités ascétiques, L’Éloge du désert (De laude eremi ) et Le Mépris du monde (De contemptu mundi), et d’un récit de martyre, La Passion des martyrs d’Agaune.

Details
Braulio episcopus Caesaraugustanus (590 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/b/braulio_v_z.shtml
Homme d'une grande culture, ami d'Isidore, ce fut l'un des lettrés les plus renommés de la renaissance wisigothique. A la tête de l'évêché de Saragosse dès (631-651). Il paracheva les oeuvres de son maître, Isidore de Séville, dont les Etymologies n'avaient pu être terminées, en les répartissant en 20 livres. Les Ep. 3-8 fournissent des données intéressantes sur leur composition. Braulo joua un rôle de permier plan dans les évènements de la vie ecclésiastique : collabora à la compilation du code wisigothique, et au nom du conseil de Tolède de 638, il écrivit au pape Honorius une lettre rejetant ses accusations de tiédeur de la foi contre les évêque espagnols. Outre une collection de lettres, il a laissé une Vie de S. Emilien, ainsi qu'un hymne dédié à ce saint, ermite de l'Eglise d'Espagne. Elle fut écrite à partir de sources orales et rapporte des faits le plus souvent miraculeux destinés à preésenter un modèle de vie chrétienne. Cette vie signale une recherche littéraire quelque peu prolixe, l'auteur termine ce travail appliqué par un hymne élégant en l'honneur du saint. Sa correspondance, 4 lettres, s'inspire des modèles du genre au IVe et Ve siècle, par la variété des thèmes, la recherche de sa forme, le goût pour les relations d'amitié et les échanges de politesse, mais c'est aussi une source importante pour la connaissance de l'histoire espagnole.

Details
Martinus Bracarensis episcopus (510 ? - ?)

Né en Pannonie, Martin arriva en Galice vers 550, venant peut-être de Constantinople et de l'Orient, où il s'était rendu en pèlerinage. Peu après, il fonda un monastère à Dumio, près de Braga (Portugal), et peut-être d'autres encore. Vers 556, il devint évêque de Dumio. En 569 ou 570, à la mort du métropolitain Lucrétius, Martin fut élevé au siège de Braga, qu'il occupa jusqu'à sa mort en même temps que celui de Dumio. En 572, il présida le second concile de Braga (il avait déjà assisté au premier concile en 561). Après avoir construit plusieurs églises en l'honneur de son homonyme Martin de Tours dont il favorisa le culte, il mourut probablement le 20 mars 579.
Il est l'auteur d'ouvrages divers de théologie, de morale et d'ascétisme, de liturgie et de droit canon.

Details
Fructuosus Bracarensis episcopus (500 ? - ?)

Informations par la Vita Fructuosi écrite peu après sa mort. Grand organisateur monastique, auteur d'une Regula monachorum vers 640.

Details
Ildephonsus Toletanus (606 ? - ?)
Details
Eugenius episcopus Toletanus (550 ? - ?)

D'ascendance noble, déja clerc, il se rendit à Tolède où il fit d'abord profession monastique. Puis il collabora comme archidiacre avec l'évêque Braulion. A la mort d'Eugène I, en 646, le roi Chindaswinthe décida de le faire évêque de Tolède, ce qui se heurta à la vigoureuse résistance de Braulion. Evêque pendant 12 ans, il présida les conciles de Tolède VII (653), IX (655), X (656). Il contribua de façon décisive à l'intauration de la liturgie hispanique. D'esprit délicat et timide, de petite santé, il atteignit les plus hauts sommets de la création littéraire. Ses poèmes de circonstance, inspirés de la poésie classique et chrétienne témoignent du tarissemet des formes poétiques brèves dans la latinité tardive. Selon le voeu du roi Chindaswinthe, il réécrit l'Hexaméron de Dracontius, poème cosmogonique. On a aussi de lui quelques lettres, mais on a perdu son De Trinatate.

Details
Agobard of Lyon (769 ? - ?)

Archbishop of Lyon (816-840).

Details
Philostorgius (368 ? - ?)

Natif de Borissos en Cappadoce Seconde, Philostorge s'installe à Constantinople vers l'âge de vingt ans et y devient un disciple de l'arien Eunome qu'il rencontre et dont il tire un grand profit sur le plan de la connaissance de l'histoire et des idées du mouvement eunomien. C'est une personnalité cultivée, dont les intérêts dépassent les seules questions ecclésiastiques : géographie, zoologie, astronomie, médecine. Il a voyagé et semble connaître des lieux tels qu'Antioche, la Palestine et Alexandrie.

Details
Adam of Perseigne (1145 ? - ?)

Adam of Perseigne, a Cistercian, whose life is mostly unknown to us, was probably from Champagne. Born around 1145, he was successively a canon regular, a Benedictine in Marmoutier, then a Cistercian perhaps in Pontigny to begin with, and finally Abbot of Perseigne (in Maine) around 1188. His sixty or so Letters show that he was in charge of important missions (summoned to Rome by Pope Celestine III for a controversy with Joachim of Flore; sent by the general chapter of Cîteaux, with two other Cistercian abbots, to deal with Richard the Lionheart regarding the abbeys located in the remotest parts of England; assisting Fulk of Neuilly in preaching the Fourth Crusade) and in relation to many dignitaries (rulers, powerful women, bishops, popes, kings, etc.), to some of whom, like Richard of England, he was confessor. Above all, he was a wise counsellor and a great spiritual master.

Details
Carthusiani (1084 ? - ?)
Details
Benedictus Casinensis abbas (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (Aristeae ad Philocratem epistula) (100 ? - ?)

There exists a letter to Philocrates transmitted under the pseudonym of a pagan named Aristaeus. This "historical novel" which narrates the translation of the Torah into the Septuagint in Alexandria under Ptolemy II seems to be an apology for Judaism probably dating from the 2nd century B.C..

Details
Anonymus (Targum) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (It.) (0 ? - ?)

Ces Homélies (éditées par Paul Mercier en SC 161) ont longtemps été attribuées à Augustin (PL 39), Maxime (PL 57) et surtout Ambroise (PL17).C'est grâce à une découverte du P. Raymond Etaix qu'on a pu établir qu'elles étaient en fait l'oeuvre d'un auteur inconnu du IXe siècle. Elles nous renseignent sur la liturgie, la vie chrétienne et la prédication à cette époque en Italie du Nord.

Details
Anonymus (Carthag.) (0 ? - ?)

En mai 411, près de six cents évêques, pour moitié catholiques, pour moitié donatistes, s'’affrontèrent physiquement à la Conférence de Carthage sous la présidence d'’un représentant impérial. Les actes de 411 sont une mosaïque de pièces d'’origines diverses qui furent jointes aux procès-verbaux sténographiés.

Details
Anonymus (Catena Palestiniana in Psalmum 118) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (cath.) (1200 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (rit.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (expositio) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Viventiolus (?) (460 ? - ?)

The anonymous author of the Life of the Jura Fathers could be the monk Viventiolus of Condat (Saint-Claude) who became Bishop of Lyon, at the latest in 515.

Details
Anonymus (Baruch) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (anomoeos) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (catharus) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Maximinus episcopus Gothorum (et Palladius episcopus Ratiarensis) (360 ? - ?)

Evêque arien
Acheter le livre : http://www.editionsducerf.fr/html/fiche/fichelivre.asp?n_liv_cerf=853

Details
Anonymus (acephalus) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (erem.) (1 ? - ?)

Hermits and monks who lived, in imitation of St. Anthony, in the Egyptian deserts in the 4th and 5th centuries. The Desert Fathers left the cities to lead a solitary life. Some of their names are known but most of them were anonymous (they are known as "an elder," "a monk," etc.), or known by their first name only, preceded by the title of "abba" (father). There are also a few women. They grouped together in colonies, in the deserts of Scetis, Nitria or Kellia, around Amoun of Nitira or Macarius. They attracted to them many believers in search of spiritual guidance.

Details
Conc. mer. (511 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (Const. ap.) (380 - ?)

Premier du genre il y a seize siècles, voici le code de droit canonique de l'an 380! Ces Constitutions se disent apostoliques, mais ne le sont que par procédé littéraire. Elles sont l'oeuvre d'un groupe qui a recueilli à Antioche, à la fin du IVe s., les traditions et les écrits qui pouvaient faire loi pour les chrétiens. Elles sont réparties en huit livres.

Details
Anonymus (Regula Magistri) (450 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (paganus) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Patres Lerinses (400 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (Sinaïticus)
Details
Basilius Seleuciensis (400 ? - ?)

Born around the beginning of the 5th century, Basil governed the Church of Seleucia for more than thirty years (after 431, and at least until 468). Oscillating according to theological expediency, he anathematized Eutyches at the synod of Constantinople (448), voted in the “Robber Council” of Ephesus (449) for the rehabilitation of the same heretic and the deposition of the Patriarch Flavian, and condemned Eutyches again at the Council of Chalcedon (451), only narrowly escaping the deposition with which he was threatened. Fifty homilies, not all authentic, have come down to us under his name.

Details
Sergius I (600 ? - ?)

Sergius I was Pope from 15 December 687 to 8 September 701. He refused to accept certain canons of the Quinisext Council of 692, convened by Emperor Justinian II and which brought together only Eastern bishops, whose aim was to reform canon law in order to put an end to the decadence of morals, but which clashed with Western doctrines and practices. Sergius I was a promoter of the cult of the Lamb of God and introduced into the Roman Church the celebration of the Dormition of the Virgin Mary and the feast of her Nativity.

Details
Ambrosiaster (300 ? - ?)

This is the name given, since the Maurists, to the pseudo-Ambrosian author of a 13-book Commentary on the Epistles of St. Paul during the pontificate of Damasus I (366-384), and of a collection of 127 Questions on the Old and NewTestaments, which also seem to have been attributed to Ambrose, before being attributed to Augustine from the end of the 8th century.

Details
Petrus Chrysologus episcopus Rauennatensis (380 ? - ?)

Archevêque de Ravenne, ami du pape Léon, un théologien de l’Incarnation et de la grâce. On conserve de lui plus de 180 Sermons sur les Évangiles, les lettres de Paul, l’Oraison dominicale, le symbole baptismal, la pénitence et les saints.

Details
Paulinus Nolanus (353 ? - ?)

Paulinus was born in Bordeaux around 353 into a very wealthy Christian senatorial family. After studying under Ausonius, he embarked on a brilliant career: consul in Rome (378) then proconsul in Campania (379 or 381). He was educated in the Christian faith by Ambrose of Milan, then returned to Aquitaine, where he married a pious Spaniard, Tharasia (385); he was baptised shortly afterwards by Delphinus of Bordeaux. Through the influence of his wife, he distributed his immense wealth to the poor and led a life of poverty and chastity with her in Spain. Ordained a priest against his better wishes in Barcelona (394), he left for Italy and settled in Nola, in Campania, drawn by his devotion to the martyr Saint Felix, and there he continued his monastic life, even when he was chosen as bishop in 409. He enjoyed close friendships, and corresponded, with the greatest Christian figures of the time (Jerome, Augustine, Sulpicius Severus, Pammachius). He is the author of Poems and Letters. He died in 431.

Details
Vincentius Lirinensis (350 ? - ?)

Né en Gaule, il a été moine et prêtre à Lérins. Il est l'auteur du fameux Commonitorium sur le principe catholique de la Tradition.

Details
Alcuinus, Albinus (730 ? - ?)

De famille noble, Alcuin fut formé à l'école du monastère d'York. Avec son maître Aelbert, il côtoie l'élite européenne et entre finalement au service de Charlemagne, dont il devient le directeur des études à la cour. Il finira sa vie à l'abbaye de Saint-Martin de Tours.
Il fera beaucoup pour l'amélioration de la langue latine, écrivant traités de grammaire et d'orthographe. Il jouera également un rôle essentiel dans la révision du texte biblique et du missel romain, et tentera de rendre accessibles à l'aristocratie carolingienne les oeuvres des Pères, par des écrits de synthèse. Il est aussi auteur de Lettres et de Poèmes.

Details
Theodorus Studites (759 - ?)

Moine et supérieur du fameux monastère du Studion à Byzance, défenseur de l'orthodoxie, en particulier au moment de l'iconoclasme, plusieurs fois exilé par le pouvoir civil.
Ecrits ascétiques et polémiques, lettres, poésies, discours et catéchèses.

Details
Bruno monachus (Carthusianus) (1030 ? - ?)

De famille noble, il commença ses études dans sa ville natale, à la collégiale de Saint-Cunibert, et fit ensuite des études dephilosophie et de théologie à Reims et, peut-être aussi àParis. Vers1055, il revint à Cologne pour recevoir de l’archevêque Annon, avec la prêtrise, un canonicat à Saint-Cunibert.
En 1056 ou 1057, il futrappelé à Reims par l’archevêque Gervais pour y devenir, avec le titred'écolâtre, professeur de grammaire, dephilosophie et de théologie ; il devait garder une vingtaine d'années cettechaire, où il travailla à répandre les doctrines clunisiennes et, comme on allait dire bientôt, grégoriennes. Maître Bruno dont on conserve un commentaire des psaumes et une étude sur les épitres de saint Paul est précis, clair et concis en même temps qu’affable, bon et souriant « il est, dire ses disciples,éloquent, expert dans tous les arts, dialecticien, grammairien, rhéteur,fontaine de doctrine, docteur des docteurs. »
Sasituation devint difficile quand l'archevêque Manassès deGournay,simoniaque avéré, monta en 1067 sur le siège de Reims ; ce prélatquin'ignorait pas l'opposition de Bruno, tenta d'abord de se leconcilier, et ledésigna même comme chancelier du Chapitre (1075), maisl'administrationtyrannique de Manassès, qui pillait les biens d'Eglise,provoqua desprotestations, auxquelles Bruno s'associa ; elles devaientaboutir à ladéposition de l'indigne prélat en 1080 ; en attendant,Manassès priva Bruno deses charges et s'empara de ses biens qui ne luifurent rendus que lorsquel'archevêque perdit son siège.
Bruno,réfugié d'abord au château d'Ebles de Roucy, puis,semble-t-il, àCologne, chargé de mission à Paris, et redoutant d'être appelé àlasuccession de Manassès, décida de renoncer à la vie séculière.Cetterésolution aurait été fortifiée en lui, d'après une tradition querépètent leshistoriens chartreux, par l'épisode parisien (1082) desfunérailles du chanoineRaymond Diocrès qui se serait trois fois levé deson cercueil pour se déclarerjugé et condamné au tribunal de Dieu.
En1083, Bruno se rendit avec deux compagnons, Pierre etLambert, auprès desaint Robert de Molesme, pour lui demander l'habit monastiqueetl'autorisation de se retirer dans la solitude, à Sèche-Fontaine. Maiscen'était pas encore, si près de l'abbaye, la vraie vieérémitique. Sur leconseil de Robert de Molesme et, semble-t-il, del'abbé de la Chaise-Dieu,Seguin d'Escotay, Bruno se rendit, avec sixcompagnonsauprèsdu saint évêque Hugues de Grenoble qui accueillit avec bienveillancelapetite colonie. Une tradition de l'Ordre veut que saint Huguesait vu les septermites annoncés dans un songe sous l'apparence de septétoiles. Il conduisitBruno et ses compagnons dans un site montagneuxd'une sévérité vraimentfarouche, le désert de Chartreuse (1084).En1085 une première église s'y élevait. Le sol avait été cédé enpropriété parHugues aux religieux qui en gardèrent le nom de Chartreux.Quant àl'appartenance spirituelle, il paraît que la fondation eutd'abord quelque lienavec la Chaise-Dieu, à qui Bruno la remit quand ildut se rendre en Italie ;mais l'abbé Seguin restitua la Chartreuse auprieur Landuin quand celui-ci, pourobéir à saint Bruno, rétablit lacommunauté, et il reconnut l'indépendance del'ordre nouveau (1090).

Details
Andreas Cretensis (660 ? - ?)

Moine à Jérusalem, il participe au concile de Constantinople de 680 et devient diacre dans la capitale, puis archevêque de Gortyne (Crète) jusqu'à sa mort en 740. En dehors de ses homélies, il est connu pour les odes du canon liturgique qu'il a composées. Particulièrement important pour sa théologie mariale.

Details
Apollinaris Laodicenus (310 ? - ?)

Born around 310, Apollinaris became Bishop of Laodicea in 360 and died around 392. He has the same name as his father, a priest and writer from the same city. Both father and son were linked to Athanasius in the struggle with Arianism. The expression “one sole nature incarnate of the Word of God", later taken up by Cyril of Alexandria who believed it to be from Athanasius, was in fact from Apollinaris. His doctrine, which was condemned at the Council of Constantinople of 381, is difficult to know precisely except via his opponents, such as Gregory of Nazianzus: according to Apollinaris, Christ assumed the body and soul of a man, but not the rational human mind (nous). A prolific writer and poet, he is the author of dogmatic writings, sometimes disguised under the name of orthodox authors (Athanasius, for example), sometimes partially reconstructable from florilegia or, in the case of his Antirrheticus, from the refutation made by Gregory of Nyssa. His apologetic and exegetical works are even less well preserved, and only in fragments, especially in exegetical catenae. A Paschal homily, transmitted under the name of John Chrysostom, was attributed to him by E. Cattaneo (SC 36).

Details
Firmicus Maternus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Fortunat[ian]us episcopus Aquileiensis (300 ? - ?)
Details
Eusebius episcopus Vercellensis (283 ? - ?)
Details
Faustinus presbyter Luciferianus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Filastrius episcopus Brixiensis (300 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus Diaconus Mediolanensis (370 ? - ?)
Details
Zeno episcopus Veronensis (300 ? - ?)

De la vie de cet évêque de Vérone (d’après le témoignage d’Ambroise), peut-être originaire d’Afrique, on ne sait pratiquement rien. On lui attribue quelque 90 homélies et traités, distribués en deux livres. Dans leur grande majorité, ces homélies, ou fragments d’homélies, constituent des séries, plus ou moins complètes, de brefs commentaires exégétiques, à dominante typologique, sur les lectures de la Vigile pascale – Genèse, Exode, Isaïe, Daniel – et du jour de Pâques. Les autres ont pour thème central un personnage de l’Ancien Testament (Abraham, Juda et Thamar, Job, Jonas, etc.) ou sont de petits traités moraux sur la patience, l’avarice, la pudicité, la continence, la justice, l’humilité, sur les vertus de foi, d’espérance et de charité, etc., beaucoup plus rarement des homélies-traités à thème doctrinal ou sacramentel (sur la naissance du Christ, sur la Résurrection, sur le baptême) ; une seule célèbre un martyr (S. Arcadius de Césarée de Mauritanie).

Details
Vigilius episcopus Tridentinus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Gaudentius episcopus Brixiensis (327 ? - ?)
Details
Maximus episcopus Taurinensis (300 ? - ?)
Details
Cassiodorus (485 ? - ?)

Born around 485 in Squillace, Calabria, Cassiodorus is the descendant of an illustrious family. He held the highest office under the Emperors Theodoric, Athalaric and Vitigas. In 540, after having been the prefect of the court and consul three times, he suddenly retired to the monastery of Vivarium founded by him near Squillace. He died there around 580. He is the author of an Ecclesiastical History, a book addressed to monks and clerics (the Institutiones), as well as scriptural commentaries.

Details
Gregorius episcopus Turonensis (538 ? - ?)

From a Senatorial family in Clermont-Ferrand, he was ordained a deacon in 563. In 573, he succeeded his cousin, Bishop Euphronius, in the episcopal seat of Tours and became an influential figure in the Merovingian Church. He died on 17 November 594. His writings are important for the history of his time: 10 books of the History of the Franks, 8 books of Miracles; a hagiographic work, De cursu stellarum ratio; liturgical work, etc.

Details
Haymo Autissiodorensis (800 ? - ?)

L’homme est mal connu. On sait parson élève Heiric qu’il enseigna les sciences scripturaires, sans doute à l’abbaye Saint-Germain d’Auxerre.
Ses dates d’activité, fixées selon des critères internes à 840-860, ont été révisées par J. J. Contreni, qui estime qu’Haymon a dû commencer à travailler dès les années 830 et terminer sa vie vers 860 comme abbé de Cessy-les-Bois (alors dépendance de St-Germain, située à env. 60 km au sud-ouest d’Auxerre).
Il aurait été élève voire collègue du grammairien Murethach qui semble l’avoir influencé au cours de son séjour auxerrois.
Haymon a composé surtout des traités exégétiques et des homélies. L’essentiel de son Âœuvre est actuellement édité dans la Patrologie Latine (116-118) sous le nom d’un homonyme, Haymon d’Halberstadt, avec lequel il fut confondu depuis Jean Trithème jusqu’aux travaux d’E.Riggenbach (1907).
Les éditions d’Haymon dans la PLsont cependant à utiliser avec précaution : son Âœuvre a été remaniée, sans doute par lui-même pour certains traités, mais également pard’autres savants, auxerrois ou non, tels Remi d’Auxerre, élèved’Heiric.
La tradition manuscrite de ses textes, utilisés assez librement dans un milieu scolaire, est donc complexe, ce qui pose de nombreux problèmes d’attribution.

Details
Reticius Episcopus Augustodunensis (250 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius episcopus Illiberitanus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Prosper Aquitanus (390 ? - ?)

« Le plus grand disciple de saint Augustin, et le chef des disciples de saint Augustin », selon la formule du Grand Arnauld, Prosper a fait de son activité littéraire et théologique une pure défense de la personne et de la doctrine d'Augustin. Après avoir sans doute suivi un enseignement de rhétorique à Bordeaux, il se trouve à la fin des années 420 à Marseille, au moment même où Cassien et ses moines donnent naissance, en réaction aux derniers écrits augustiniens sur la grâce (le De gratia et libero arbitrio et le De correptione et gratia), à ce que l'on appellera à la fin du XVIe siècle le « semipélagianisme ». Tout laïc qu'il soit, Prosper s'intéresse vivement aux questions théologiques et en particulier à celles relatives à la grâce, telles que les développe celui qu'il ne tarde pas à considérer comme son maître, Augustin. Après s'être adressé à lui (Ep. 225 d'Augustin) pour lui rendre compte des réactions anti-augustiniennes des monastères provençaux de Marseille et de Lérins et pour l'inciter à composer à l'adresse de ces milieux monastiques le De praedestinatione sanctorum et le De dono perseverantiae, c'est de son propre chef qu'il entreprend, dès avant la mort de l'évêque d'Hippone, de les combattre, tant en vers qu'en prose (dans son poème didactique De ingratis, comme dans son traité contre Cassien, Contra collatorem, ou encore dans des Responsiones destinées à réfuter les accusations calomnieuses ou à réparer les mésinterprétations de ses destinataires). Ces différents ouvrages, qui témoignent d'une entière assimilation de la doctrine augustinienne sur la grâce, cependant quelque peu adoucie à partir de la mort du maître, révèlent en Prosper un excellent vulgarisateur en même temps qu'un puissant relais, non dénué d'originalité : avec lui naît véritablement l'« augustinisme médiéval ». Ce sont de toute évidence ces qualités d'habileté rhétorique, d'esprit de synthèse et de « sentiment » théologique qui le font choisir en 440 par le futur pape Léon le Grand, de passage en Gaule, comme secrétaire. Outre son activité de controversiste, Prosper rédige des ouvrages de morale (en compilant des Sententiae) et se fait surtout le continuateur, dans sa Chronique, d'Eusèbe de Césarée et de Jérôme, en fournissant à ses lecteurs un important témoignage sur cette période de l'Histoire, marquée par l'implantation des peuples barbares en Gaule. Il termine donc sa carrière à Rome, participant à la rédaction d'écrits pontificaux tout en poursuivant son œuvre personnelle.

Details
Ferrandus diaconus Carthaginiensis (450 ? - ?)

Pour une biographie et une bibliographie mises à jour, voir la page de l'auteur dans le Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexicon du site allemand Bautz.

Details
Faustus episcopus Reiensis (400 ? - ?)

Né en Bretagne, probablement insulaire, un peu avant 410, Fauste fut moine de Lérins assez tôt pour y connaître saint Honorat, fondateur et premier abbé, qui quitta le monastère pour le siège épiscopal d'Arles vers la fin de 427. Quand Maxime, deuxième abbé, devint évêque de Riez (434), Fauste lui succéda à Lérins, comme prêtre et abbé ; il eut à défendre les droits de l'abbaye (vers 452) contre Théodore, évêque de Fréjus. A la mort de Maxime (vers 460), il lui succéda au siège épiscopal de Riez. Il assista à un concile romain tenu à la fin de 462, prit une part active aux affaires ecclésiastiques du sud-est de la Gaule jusqu'à Lyon, intervint dans les ultimes négociations de l'Empire avec les wisigoths, et s'efforça d'adoucir la domination de ces envahisseurs. Déjà âgé, il fut exilé, vers 477, par Euric, roi des wisigoths, peut-être pour son opposition à l'arianisme. Son exil cessa au plus tard avec la mort d'Euric (fin 484, ou début 485). Il serait mort vers 495, vénéré pour sa science et sa vertu, en particulier l'austérité monastique de sa vie, son zèle pastoral, son activité charitable. Fauste connut à Lérins Honorat, Maxime, Caprais, Loup de Troyes, Salvien et Vincent de Lérins ; à Riez, il entretiendra des relations épistolaires, entre autres avec Sidoine Apollinaire † 489, et Ruric († après 507), évêque de Limoges, son fils spirituel. Il est l'objet d'un culte local très ancien, mais il n'est pas inscrit au martyrologe romain.

Details
Apollinaris Sidonius episcopus Aruernorum (430 - ?)
Details
Venantius Fortunatus episcopus Pictauiensis (530 ? - ?)

Né près de Trévise, en Vénétie, Venance Fortunat étudia à Aquilée et à Ravenne. Vers 597, il est élu évêque de Poitiers. Il est l'auteur de Vies de saints (des 4e-6e siècles), de poèmes religieux et d'hymnes.

Details
Severus Antiochenus (465 ? - ?)

Né à Sozopolis (en Pisidie), étudiant à Alexandrie et Berytus (Beyrouth), il est baptisé en 488 et entre dans un couvent près de Gaza. De formation monophysite, il est consacré évêque d'Antioche en 512, mais il doit fuir en Egypte avec l'avènement de Justin en 518 et la réaction antimonophysite qui en découla. Vers 535, il est rappelé, puis de nouveau éloigné en 536, et ses écrits (originalement en grec) sont détruits. Il se retire de nouveau en Egypte, où il meurt en 538. Parmi ses écrits qui nous sont parvenus en traduction syriaque, on compte 125 Homélies cathédrales prononcées lors de ses années d'épiscopat (512-518).

Details
Iohannes Climacus (570 ? - ?)

Moine au mont Sinaï, écrivain ascétique : son oeuvre principale est l'Échelle du Paradis.

Details
Gregorius Palamas (1296 - ?)

Archevêque de Thessalonique, Grégoire était moine au Mont-Athos et défendit brillamment la doctrine spirituelle de l'hésychasme. Cela lui valut de nombreuses persécutions, de voir sa doctrine condamnée par un concile (annulé quelques années plus tard) et finalement d'être canonisé neuf ans après sa mort.

Details
Angelomus Luxouiensis monachus (800 ? - ?)

Moine bénédictin de Luxeuil en Franche-Comté, exégète mystique. Un moment à la cour de Lothaire Ier.
A glané des extraits des Pères pour ses commentaires sur la Genèse, lesLivres des Rois, le Cantique des Cantiques, les Evangiles.

Details
(H)rabanus Maurus (780 ? - ?)

Enfant, envoyé au monastère de Fulda. Après son ordination diaconale en 801, passe quelques années à Tours à l'école d'Alcuin puis revient enseigner au monastère de Fulda dont il deviendra l'abbé en 822. Il contribuera grandement au développement du scriptorium et de la bibliothèque. Appelé en 847 par Louis le Germanique à l'archevêché de Mayence, il exerça 8 ans cette charge, jusqu'à sa mort le 4 février 856.
Raban fut un très grand savant et théologien. Ses commentaires exégétiques, nombreux et abondants, reprennent les écrits des Pères et ont connu une immense diffusion au Moyen Age.

Details
Victricius Rotomagensis (330 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/v/victricius_b_v_r.shtml

Details
Iulianus Pomerius (400 ? - ?)

Prêtre, maître de S. Césaire d'Arles, il nous a laissé un De uita contemplatiua.

Details
Orientius (350 ? - ?)

Auteur du Commonitorium

Details
Ambrosius Autpertus (730 ? - ?)

Cf. Claudio Leonardi, "Spiritualità di Ambrogio Autperto", StMed 9, 1968, p. 1-131.

Details
Isidorus Hispalensis episcopus (560 ? - ?)

Élevé par son frère Léandre, il lui succède à l'épiscopat de Séville vers 600. Il préside le Concile national de Tolède en 633 et meurt le 4 avril 636. Pour le reste, sa vie est très mal connue : Isidore n'est guère célèbre que grâce à ses œuvres, qui eurent une grande diffusion au Moyen Âge (Étymologies en 20 livres, Sentences...).

Details
Nicephorus Blemmydes (1197 - ?)

Born in 1197, the son of a doctor, he left Constantinople at the age of 7 after the city was taken by the Latins in 1204, and took refuge in Asia Minor in the Empire of Nicaea, studying first in Bursa, Nicaea and Smyrna, and finally in Scamander in Troy. Noticed by Emperor John III Ducas Vatatzes and by Patriarch Germanus II, he joined the patriarchal clergy in 1224. He became a monk in 1234 and a little later settled near Ephesus. Around 1241 he decided to found his own monastery in the region, dedicated to "Christ Who Is". He probably moved there in 1249. He refused the office of Patriarch in 1254 and lived increasingly secluded in his monastery, where he died in 1269 or 1272.

Details
Paulinus Aquileiensis (730 ? - ?)

Grammaticae magister de Charlemagne. Devient patriarche d'Aquilée en 787, joue un rôle important dans la christianisation de la Carinthie et de la Styrie.
Oeuvre théologique et spirituelle d'envergure: lutte contre l'adoptianisme espagnol (Libellus sacrosyllabus, et surtout Contre Felicem); auteur du premier "miroir du prince", le Liber exhortationis ainsi que d'une oeuvre poétique encore mal délimitée.

Details
Paulus Diaconus (720 ? - ?)

De famille noble. Entre comme moine au Mont-Cassin en 774.
Séjourne à la cour de Charlemagne avec Pierre de Pise et Paulin d'Aquilée de 782 à 787.
Historiographe des Lombards.
Auteur notamment des Gesta episcoporum Mettensium , histoire des évêques de Metz des origines au VIIIe siècle, d'une Vita beati Gregorii papae hagiographique et d'un Homéliaire, compilation d'homélies patristiques, qui sera couramment utilisé dans l'Empire.

Details
Iosephus Scottus (700 ? - ?)

Auteur d'un Commentaire sur Isaïe

Details
Theodulfus Aurelianensis (750 ? - ?)

D'origine wisigothique, il arrive à la cour de Charlemagne en 780. En 798, il devint évêque d'Orléans et abbé de Fleury. Il fit construire la chapelle de Germigny.
Conseiller théologique de l'empereur, il travailla notamment à la révision du texte biblique.
Exilé en 818 au monastère Saint-Aubin d'Angers.

Details
Paschasius Radbertus (790 ? - ?)

Moine à Corbie avant 826, puis, après avoir fondé l'abaye de Corvey enSaxe, devient abbé de Corbie en 843, mais doit abandonner sa charge en849.
Il laisse une oeuvre abondante, notamment un commentaire de l'évangile de saint Matthieu et un traité eucharistique, De corpore et sanguine Domini.

Details
Florus Lugdunensis (795 ? - ?)

A deacon at first, he succeeded Agobard as archbishop of Lyon from 841 to 852.

Details
Amalarius Metensis (775 ? - ?)

Liturgiste et théologien.
Eleve d'Alcuin à Tours, il fut nommé archevêque de Trêves en 811.
En 813, membre d'une ambassade à Constantinople.
Maître à l'école palatine d'Aix-la-Chapelle.
Durant l'exil d'Agobard, il eut en charge le diocèse de Lyon et y proposa des innovations liturgiques.

Details
Benedictus abbas Anianensis (750 ? - ?)

D'origine wisigothique, élevé à la cour de Pépin le Bref et de Charlemagne. Se retire d'abord au monastère de Saint-Seine, puis à Aniane près de Montpellier. Contribue activement à la diffusion de la Règle de Saint Benoît. Auteur de la Concordia Regularum. Lutte contre l'adoptianisme.

Details
Sedulius Scottus (810 ? - ?)

Irlandais. En 848, est pris sous la protection de l'évêque de Liège, Hartgar, et étudie la littérature grecque et latine. Auteur de Poèmes et d'un Miroir des Princes.

Details
Ammar al-Basri (800 ? - ?)

Apologète nestorien du califat de Bagdad. On a de lui deux ouvrages :
1*. Le Livre de la démonstration de l'ordre de l'économie divine* (178 pages)
2. Le Livre des questions et des réponses (286 pages).

Details
Lupus Ferrariensis (805 ? - ?)

Elève de Raban Maur à Fulda, il fut nommé abbé de Ferrières par Charles le Chauve en 841.

Details
Ratramnus Corbeiensis monachus (800 ? - ?)

Moine à Corbie, élève de Paschase Radbert; engagé dans les luttes théologiques de son temps, en particulier sur la prédestination et l'eucharistie.

Details
Gotteschalcus Orbacensis (807 ? - ?)

Etudie à Fulda. Devient moine à Orbais (Marne) et prêtre en 835.
Condamné en 848-849 pour sa doctrine de la double prédestination, ilsera retenue prisonnier par Hincmar de Reims jusqu'à sa mort.
Forte personnalité du monde carolingien.

Details
Hincmarus Remensis (806 ? - ?)

Etudie à l'abbaye de Saint-Denis, devient en 845 archevêque de Reims.
Il réfléchit aux rapports entre l'Eglise et la monarchie, sera très influent auprès de Louis le Pieux notamment.
A lancé Jean Scot dans les disputes théologiques.

Details
Chrodegangus Metensis (715 ? - ?)

Né dans les environs de Liège, d'une famille de la haute noblesse franque, Chrodegang étudie au monastère de Saint-Trond, puis fait partie de la cour impériale de Charles Martel puis de Carloman. Il se voit confier l'évêché de Metz en 741.
Chrodegang est l’un des principaux réformateurs des institutions religieuses et de la liturgie au milieu du VIIIe siècle. In introduisit à Metz des usages liturgiques romains qui se diffusèrent ensuite en Gaule. On le connaît surtout par sa Règle des Chanoines (écrite entre 751 et 755), qui visait à rapprocher le code de conduite des clercs au service de la cathédrale de celui des moines dans les monastères. Elle contient de précieux renseignements sur le déroulement du culte et des offices et connut un très grand succès.

Details
Boethius (480 ? - ?)

Philosophe, savant et poète. D'une très ancienne famille romaine, il reçut une bonne formation latine et grecque ; il fut consul, puis ministre de Théodoric le Grand. Sa Consolation de la philosophie, très lue durant tout le Moyen Âge, a été écrite en prison, avant son exécution pour des raisons politiques.

Details
Grimlaicus presbyter (800 ? - ?)

Auteur de la Règle des solitaires

Details
Smaragdus Sancti Michaelis (780 ? - ?)

Présent à la cour impériale, il participe à la rédaction des textes sur le Filioque (809).
Devient abbé de Saint-Mihiel (diocèse de Verdun).
Auteur notamment de La Voie Royale, un miroir des princes destiné à Louis le Pieux.

Details
Auctores Collectionis Avellanae (0 ? - ?)
Details
Legislatores Codicis Theodosiani (438 - ?)
Details
Heiricus Autissiodorensis (841 - ?)

Elève de Loup de Ferrières et d'Haymon d'Auxerre, ville où il est moine et enseignant.

Details
Martinus Legionensis (1130 - ?)

Il était prêtre et chanoine régulier de Saint Augustin au monsatère de Saint Isidore de Léon en Espagne. C'était un écrivain ascétique prolifique, utilisant souvent les oeuvres de S. Grégoire le Grand et S. Isisdore de Séville. Théologien augustin, il est mort en odeur de sainteté. On trouve ses oeuvres en PL 208 et 209. Il est souvent appelé du nom de Saint ou Bienheureux:: "Un culte lui fut rendu dans le diocèsede Léon, sans qu'il y ait eu de procès canonique." Le meilleur article paru sur lui est sans conteste celui du R.P. Aimé Solignac, DSp10, 685-686. Deux extraits de ses sermons sont traduits dans le Lectionnaire de Solesmes.

Details
Hugo Folietanus (de Folieto) (1100 ? - ?)

Chanoine augustin au prieuré de Saint-Laurent-au-Bois, près de Corbie. Auteur de plusieurs ouvrages d'édification.

Details
Iacobus Vitriacensis (1160 ? - ?)

Chanoine augustin.
Prêche la croisade.
Evêque de St Jean d'Acre en 1216.
Auteur de deux ouvrages historiques, l'un sur le Terre Sainte et l'histoire des croisades jusqu'en 1193, l'autre sur l'Université de Paris, et de sermons riches en exempla.

Details
Guillelmus Monachi (1100 ? - ?)

Archevêque d'Arles, élu entre 1138 et 1139 et mort le 28 décembre 1141.

Details
Victor Massiliensis (200 ? - ?)
Details
Lanfrancus (1005 ? - ?)

Formation juridique et dialectique.
Enseigne en Italie puis en France.
Moine puis prieur au Bec-Helloin.
Archevêque de Cantorbéry en 1070.
Dans le De corpore et sanguine Domini, prend parti contre la doctrine eucharistique de Bérenger de Tours.

Details
Suger(i)us de Sancto Dionysio (Sancti Dionysii) (1081 ? - ?)

Originaire de St-Omer, très tôt lié avec le roi de France Louis VI puis son fils Louis VII, auprès desquels il joue un rôle politique de premier plan. Abbé de Saint-Denis en 1122.

Details
Aedius (Eddius Stephanus) (650 ? - ?)

Auteur d'une Vita Wilfredi, vie de l'évêque d'York Wilfrid, mort en 709/710.

Details
Rembertus Hamburgensis (830 ? - ?)

Homme de confiance d'Ansgar, archevêque de Brême et de Hambourg auquel il succède en 865 et dont il écrit la biographie.

Details
Claudius Taurinensis (770 ? - ?)

Originaire d'Espagne, arrive à Lyon vers 800. Proche de Louis le Pieux dont il fut le chapelain, il est élu évêque de Turin en 817.
Exégète augustinien de grand renom.
Il jouera un rôle important dans la lutte contre le culte des images.

Details
Anonymus (Vita Wilhelmi) (1000 ? - ?)

XIIe s.

Details
Serlo Savigniacensis (1085 ? - ?)

Entre à l'abbaye bénédictine de Cérisy.
En 1113, devient l'un des fondateurs de l'abbaye de Savigny, dans le diocèse d'Avranches.
Demande le rattachement à l'ordre de Cîteaux, obtenu en 1149.
Arrive à Cîteaux peu avant la mort de saint Bernard en 1153.

Details
Petrus Cavensis (1038 - ?)

Monk of the Benedictine Abbey of Cava de' Tirreni (province of Salerno), then abbot of Venosa (Basilicata), from 1141 until his death in 1156. Author of the Commentary on the Books of the Kings, long attributed to Gregory the Great.

Details
Anonymus (myst.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Adam Scotus (1150 - ?)

12e s.
Cf. page dédiée du Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BAUTZ)

Details
Anonymus (Epict.) (50 ? - ?)
Details
Egeria (300 ? - ?)

Egeria, a great lady from the West, visited all the holy places of the Christian Near East for three years from 381 onwards. She recounted her pilgrimage in her Travel Diary, written in Latin in Constantinople. Egeria gradually supplanted Etheria as the exact form of the pilgrim's name. Indeed, the tradition (six manuscripts divided into two families) presents it in five different forms: "Egeria," "Eiheria," "Echeria," "Heteria" or "Etheria," but "Egeria" is the only one that occurs in the two textual families.

Details
Iohannes (Bolnisi) (800 ? - ?)

Jean a vécu aux 8e/9e s.
Il a vraisemblablement été moine en Palestine, où il aurait appris le grec, avant de devenir évêque de Bolnisi, au sud de l'actuelle Géorgie (province de Taširi).

Details
Apollinarius Hierapolitanus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Tatianus (100 ? - ?)

D’Assyrie, sa patrie, Tatien, philosophe païen végétarien, vient se convertir à Rome, où il est disciple de Justin ; il regagne ensuite l’Orient (Osrhoène, Cilicie, Syrie, Palestine), où il cherche à propager des doctrines et des pratiques hérétiques. Il aurait appartenu à la secte des « encratites » et aurait emprunté à Valentin sa théorie des Éons. Son Discours aux Grecs attaque tout le paganisme avec une extrême violence. Il est surtout célèbre par son Diatessaron, c’est-à-dire l’Évangile en un récit unique résultant de la fusion des quatre textes canoniques, utilisés assez librement. Ce texte fut en usage assez longtemps dans l’Église syriaque, mais l’original (grec ou syriaque ?) en a été perdu ; il est connu soit par les traductions qui en ont été faites dans presque toutes les langues du monde chrétien ancien, soit par les commentaires notamment d’Aphraate et d’Éphrem.

Details
Valerius abbas Bergidensis (630 ? - ?)

Valerio, born around 630 near Astorga (Gallecia), received a good education and, around the age of 25, converted to a life of spiritual discipline in the monastery of Compludo, in the Bierzo region. Obsessed with the idea of the devil and temptations, he lived for a long time as an anchorite. Around 680, working with Abbot Donadeus, he wrote several works to contribute to the ascetic and spiritual formation of a group of monks. These texts include, for instance, the Letter in Praise of Egeria, some poems and three autobiographical works. He also produced an extensive hagiographical compilation. He died shortly after 691.

Details
Evervinus Steinfeldensis (1100 ? - ?)

Eberwin, provost of the Norbertine canons in Steinfeld, informed Bernard of Clairvaux of the trial that took place in Cologne in 1143 against a sect professing Manichaean doctrines. He met Bernard of Clairvaux in 1147 and accompanied him during his preaching campaign in the Rhineland.

Details
Anonymus (ar.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (Liber pontificalis) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus Petricordiae (400 ? - ?)

Poet born at the beginning of the 5th century, who died after 473, bishop of Périgueux (?), author of a hagiographic poem on the Life of Saint Martin, which paraphrases in six books the writings of Sulpicius Severus on the life of Saint Martin.

Details
Rufinus presbyter (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Valerianus episcopus Cemeliensis (400 ? - ?)

Évêque de Cimiez en 439, Valérien participe à plusieurs conciles provençaux (dont celui de Riez en 439 et d'Arles en 453) ; on possède de lui des Homélies intéressantes pour la vie chrétienne à son époque, dans un style élégant.

Details
Iohannes Chrysostomus (Ps.) (350 ? - ?)

Already in his lifetime and for centuries afterwards, there were unfairly attributed to John Chrysostom a number of Greek, but also Latin, texts, almost all homilies.

Details
Hippolytus Romanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Origenes (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)

Identifié à Maximinus l'Arien par M. Meslin qui n'a pas convaincu la critique

Details
Anonymus (Vita S. Caesarii) (500 ? - ?)

La CPL note cinq auteurs: Cyprien, Firmin et Viventius, évêques; Messianus, prêtre; Etienne, diacre.

Details
Cyprianus Carthaginiensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Basilius Ancyranus (290 ? - ?)

Basile devint évêque d'Ancyre après la déposition de Marcel en 336. D'abord parmi les eusébiens, puis homéousien, il joua un rôle important en 358 dans le tournant antiarien des homéousiens. Il fut déposé au concile de Constantinople de 360.

Details
Ambrosius Mediolanensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anastasius Sinaita (620 ? - ?)

Anastase, higoumène du Sinaï jusqu'au tout début du 8e siècle, est notamment l'auteur de l'Hodegos, traité contre les monophysites.

Details
Bernardus Cluniacensis (Morlanensis) (1070 ? - ?)

Moine bénédictin de la première moitié du XIIe siècle, qui a écrit des poèmes, des ouvrages satiriques, et un traité De contemptu mundi d'environ 3000 vers, satire très amère des désordres moraux de son époque, en particulier dans le clergé et à Rome, texte souvent repris par les protestants aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles.

Details
Iustinus martyr (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Amulo Lugdunensis (750 ? - ?)

Archevêque de Lyon de 840 à 852

Details
Alexander Hierosolymitanus (150 ? - ?)

Il fut évêque de Jérusalem dans la première moitié du IIIe siècle.

Details
Ambrosiaster (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Ambrosius Mediolanensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Amphilochius Iconiensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Amphilochius Iconiensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Amphiloque d'Iconium ont été transmises divers écrits sur Basile de Césarée.

Details
Anatolius Laodicenus (200 ? - ?)

Originaire d'Alexandrie où il enseigne la philosophie aristotélicienne, il est consacré évêque par Théotecnè de Césarée qui veut en faire son coadjuteur. Mais très vite, en 268, alors qu'il passait à Laodicée pour se rendre au concile d'Antioche et juger Paul de Samosate, les chrétiens de la ville lui demandent de succéder à l'évêque Eusèbe sur le siège de Laodicée, siège qu'il occupe jusque vers 280. Il reste de lui un opuscule mathématique, et Eusèbe de Césarée a laissé un extrait de ses Canons sur la date de Pâques (HE VII, 32, 14-19), connus par ailleurs en latin.
Voir aussi la page de l'auteur sur le site de bautz: http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/a/anatolius_b_v_l.shtml

Details
Hippolytus Romanus (?) (150 ? - ?)
Details
Athanasius Alexandrinus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Athanasius Alexandrinus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Antipater Bostrensis (410 ? - ?)

Né dans les premières années du Ve siècle, il est consacré évêque de Bostra entre 451 et 457, date à laquelle le pape Léon lui demande son avis sur l'autorité des décrets de Chalcédoine. Parmi les ouvrages d'exégèse et de controverse qu'il a écrits, le plus important est la Réfutation de l'Apologie d'Origène par Eusèbe de Césarée, dont le début est conservé dans les actes de Nicée II (787) comme d'autres passages le sont chez Léonce de Byzance et chez Jean Damascène, Sacra Parallela. On a aussi de lui plusieurs homélies : une sur Jean-Baptiste, une autre sur l'Annonciation, une sur l'Epiphanie (inédite), une sur le début du jeûne (inédite). Peu de chose reste de l'homélie sur l'hémorrhoïsse, citée à Nicée II. Anastase le Sinaïte cite quant à lui une homélie sur la Croix. En latin est conservée une homélie sur l'Assomption de Marie, et les quatre homélies sur la nativité du Christ sont connues en arménien.
Voir la page de l'auteur sur le site de bautz : http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/a/antipater_b_v_b.shtml

Details
Apelles (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma (100 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma apocrypha (100 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma canonica (250 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma liturgica (300 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma hagiographica (300 ? - ?)

The Latin Passion has at least three different authors: the Preface and the martyrdom narrative are the work of one or two editors; the diary of Perpetua and the vision of Saturus were written by the martyrs themselves, but probably revised. The attribution of this text to Tertullian has been ruled out, but it may have come from the circle of his disciples.

Details
Apollinaris Laodicenus (?) (280 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Apolinaire de Laodicée (père?) nous est parvenu une Métaphrase des Psaumes en vers homériques.

Details
Apollonius antimontanista (200 ? - ?)
Details
Asterius Vrbanus (150 ? - ?)
Details
Athenagoras Atheniensis (?) (100 ? - ?)
Details
Bardesanes (?) (150 ? - ?)
Details
Aristo Pellaeus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Basilides Gnosticus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Basilius Caesariensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Basilius Caesariensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Clemens Alexandrinus (?) (100 ? - ?)
Details
Clemens Romanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Cornelius papa (180 ? - ?)
Details
Cornelius papa (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Cyprianus Carthaginiensis (?) (200 ? - ?)
Details
Cyrillus Alexandrinus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Cyrillus Alexandrinus (?) (370 ? - ?)
Details
Cyrillus Hierosolymitanus (?) (320 ? - ?)
Details
Didymus Alexandrinus (?) (320 ? - ?)
Details
Dionysius Alexandrinus (?) (190 ? - ?)

An important corpus passed under the name of Dionysius the Areopagite, mentioned in Acts 17:34. The author may have been a Christian of Syrian origin who stayed in Athens (influenced by the neoplatonists Proclus and Damascius) at the end of the 5th or early 6th century.

Details
Dionysius Corinthius (50 ? - ?)
Details
Dionysius Romanus (200 ? - ?)
Details
Donatus (320 ? - ?)
Details
Epiphanius Constantiensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Epiphanius Constantiensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Epiphanius gnosticus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Eusebius Caesariensis (?) (260 ? - ?)
Details
Firminus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Firmilianus Caesariensis (150 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/f/firmilian.shtml

Details
Gaius presbyter (250 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Nazianzenus (?) (320 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Nazianzenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Nyssenus (?) (330 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Nyssenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Thaumaturgus (?) (210 ? - ?)
Details
Heracleon gnosticus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Hilarius Pictauiensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Hilarius Pictauiensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Hymenaeus Hierosolymitanus (200 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Chrysostomus (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes II Hierosolymitanus (356 ? - ?)

Bautz

Details
Iohannes II Hierosolymitanus (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Irenaeus Lugdunensis (?) (130 ? - ?)
Details
Irenaeus Lugdunensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Isidorus Gnosticus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Iulius Africanus (160 ? - ?)
Details
Iulius Cassianus (200 ? - ?)
Details
Iustinus gnosticus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Iustinus martyr (?) (100 ? - ?)
Details
Lucianus Antiochenus (240 ? - ?)

Mythique fondateur de l’« école d’Antioche », mort martyr à Nicomédie, en 312, à la fin de la persécution de Dioclétien et de Maximien. En préparation : l’édition d’une Vie et Passion grecque inédite, dont la rédaction anonyme pourrait remonter à la fin du IVe siècle.

Details
Melito Sardianus (?) (100 ? - ?)
Details
Melito Sardianus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Methodius Olympius (?) (200 ? - ?)
Details
Methodius Olympius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Monoimus Arabs (150 ? - ?)
Details
Origenes (?) (180 ? - ?)
Details
Papias Hierapolitanus (70 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus Alexandrinus 1 (200 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/p/petrus_v_ale.shtml

Details
Petrus Alexandrinus 1 (?) (200 ? - ?)
Details
Phileas Thmuitanus (200 - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/p/Phileas.shtml

Details
Pierius Alexandrinus (200 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/p/pierius.shtml

Details
Polycrates Ephesius (130 ? - ?)
Details
Pontius diaconus (150 ? - ?)

Pour une biographie et une bibliographie mises à jour, voir la page de l'auteur dans le Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexicon du site allemand Bautz.

Details
Procopius Gazaeus (465 ? - ?)

Greek Christian rhetorician, born around 465, perhaps the brother of Bishop Zechariah the Rhetorician. Considered the main representative of the famous school of Gaza, which cultivated oratory in the Attic Greek style, he spent most of his life in this city teaching and writing, without taking part in the theological quarrels of his time. His writings of a secular nature (including a panegyric of the Emperor Anastasius and more than one hundred and sixty letters), as well as exegetical catenae (on the Octateuch, the Books of the Kings, Isaiah, Proverbs and the Song of Songs) are among the oldest, and his main sources are Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus and Cyril of Alexandria. He died around 528.

Details
Procopius Gazaeus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Rhodo Asiaticus (150 ? - ?)
Details
Serapio Antiochenus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Tertullianus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodotus Coriarius (100 ? - ?)
Details
Theodotus Gnosticus (100 ? - ?)
Details
Theognostus Alexandrinus (250 - ?)
Details
Valentinus Gnosticus (100 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/v/valentinos.shtml

Details
Victorinus Poetovionensis (?) (200 ? - ?)

http://www.bautz.de/bbkl/v/victorinus_v_p.shtml

Details
Arnobius Iunior (400 ? - ?)

Selon la Clauis, "natione Afer ; floruit in Italia tempore Leonis papae I".

Details
Iohannes Antiochenus (360 ? - ?)

Patriarch of Antioch from 429 to 441-442, he was a disciple of Nestorius. His late arrival at the Council of Ephesus enabled Cyril of Alexandria to have Nestorius condemned. But John retaliated by organizing a counter-council that condemned Cyril. The dispute was officially settled in 433 by the Act of Union: John admitted the condemnation of Nestorius, which put him at odds with some Syrian bishops such as Theodoret of Cyrus.

Details
Anonyma gnostica (0 ? - ?)
Details
Palaestinori episcopi (101 ? - ?)
Details
Antiocheni (268 ? - ?)
Details
Galli martyres (100 ? - ?)
Details
Leontius Hierosolymitanus (450 ? - ?)
Details
Anatolius Laodicenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Eusebius Emesenus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Eusebius Emesenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Mopsuestenus (Pseudo-) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Mopsuestenus (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Antiochenus (500 ? - ?)

Moine syrien, Grégoire fut nommé higoumène de la laure de Pharan (Sinaï) par l'empereur Justin II (565-578). Il devint évêque d'Antioche en 570. En 588, accusé d'immoralité par des ennemis jaloux, il fut défendu par Évagre justement nommé le Scholastique (l'avocat) et, blanchi, recouvra son siège. Son Homélie à l'armée, citée par Évagre, lui permit d'apaiser une révolte des soldats dans la région. En 591, il amena à la foi chalcédonienne les monophysites d'Antioche. Il mourut entre 592 et 593.

Details
Constantius Antiochenus (360 ? - ?)

Constance, ou Constantin (Constantios ou Constantinos, suivant les sources) était prêtre à Antioche. Après avoir rendu visite à Jean Chrysostome en exil en 404, il rentre à Antioche, puis, à défaut de devenir évêque d'Antioche, doit se résoudre à gagner Chypre. C'est l'auteur des cinq lettres qui figurent à la fin du recueil des Lettres d'exil de Jean Chrysostome.

Details
Paulinus Antiochenus (360 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Magnus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Diaconus (825 ? - ?)
Details
Anthelmus (1107 - ?)

Originaire de Savoie, né en 1107, Anthelme de Chignin, jeune chanoine de l'église de Belley et de celle de Genève, se fit Chartreux à Portes en 1136. Il fut ensuite envoyé à la Grande-Chartreuse ; il fut élu prieur en 1139. Il revint à la Chartreuse de Portes. I l fut élu évëque de Belley. Il est mort en 1178.

Details
Bernardus Carthusiae Portensis (1050 ? - ?)

Bernard, premier Prieur de la Chartreuse de Portes (fondée en 1115), peut être considéré comme l'un des principaux artisans de la naissance de l'Ordre des Chartreux.

Details
Iohannes de Montemedio (1135 ? - ?)
Details
Stephanus de Chalmeto (1100 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (haer.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Evagrius Scholasticus (536 ? - ?)

Born in Epiphania, Syria around 536, he lived in Antioch where he practised as a lawyer. Author of a six-volume Ecclesiastical History, which continues those of Socrates, Sozomen and Theodoret and covers the period from 431 to 594, the date of the death of Patriarch Gregory of Antioch, of whom he was secretary. It is an important source for the history of the Nestorian and Monophysite crises in the 5th and 6th centuries.

Details
Iliyya al-Nasibi (975 - ?)

(975-1046) Auteur arabe (et syriaque) chrétien, métropolite nestorien de Nisibe, encyclopédiste.
Consacré (1002) évêque de Bayt Nuhadra, puis (1008) métropolite de Nisibe.
En 1026 il a une série de rencontre avec un vizir musulman, d'où sortira une série de 7 Entretiens ou Séances, et une correspondance.

Details
Odoardus Cameracensis (1050 ? - ?)

Ecolâtre, moine bénédictin, fondateur de l'abbaye Saint-Martin de Tournai, et évêque de Cambrai.

Details
Aelredus abbas Rievallensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Bar Hebraeus (1225 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus (Styl.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anianus diaconus Celedensis (370 ? - ?)

Contemporain de Jérôme et de Pélage. A, le premier, traduit en latin une quinzaine d'homélies de Jean Chrysostome.

Details
Conc. Bag. (300 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma Itineraria Romana (600 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma Geographica (0 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus Burdigalensis (333 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymus Gallus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Antoninus Placentinus (450 ? - ?)

Voyage au VIe s. (570).

Details
Archidiaconus Romanus Anonymus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Babrius (100 ? - ?)

Ce poète d'origine grecque, qui a mis les Fables d'Esope en vers choliambiques, a sans doute vécu aux IIe-IIIe siècles.

Details
Caelestius (380 ? - ?)

disciple de Pélage

Details
Candidus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Concilia ecclesiae Africae (0 ? - ?)
Details
Concilia ecclesiarum Galliae (0 ? - ?)
Details
Constantius Augustus (317 ? - ?)
Details
Cyprianus Gallus (350 ? - ?)

fl. c. 397-430

Details
Cyprianus Gallus (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Eucherius episcopus Lugdunensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Eusebius episcopus Vercellensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Concilia Mediolanum (Eusebius episcopos Vercellensis Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Facundus episcopus Hermianensis (?) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Gerontius Presbyter (400 ? - ?)

Gérontius était le prêtre qui accompagna Sainte Mélanie la Jeune pendant son voyage à Jérusalem et son homme de confiance. Il devint son successeur et diriga pendant quarante-cinq ans ses monastères. Après la mort de Mélanie, il prit le parti des monophysites et fut chassé de son monastère quand l'impératrice Eudocie rentra dans l'orthodoxie. Il mourra autour de 486. Il est probablement l'auteur de la Vie de sainte Mélanie (SC 90).

Details
Gratianus (359 - ?)
Details
Gregorius episcopus Illiberitanus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Hieronymus presbyter (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Isaac (?) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Iulianus episcopus Aeclanensis (380 ? - ?)
Details
Iuuencus Presbyter (300 ? - ?)
Details
Lactantius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Lathcen Monachus (550 ? - ?)
Details
Laurentius [Mellifluus] episcopus Nouarum (300 ? - ?)
Details
Liberius Papa (250 ? - ?)
Details
Marius Victorinus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Martinus I Papa (600 ? - ?)
Details
Maximus episcopus Taurinensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Maximus episcopus Taurinensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Nicetas episcopus Remesianensis (335 ? - ?)

La ville de Rémésiana se trouve en Dacie (actuelle Serbie).

Details
Nicetas episcopus Remesianensis (?) (335 ? - ?)
Details
Optatus episcopus Mileuitanus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Ossius episcopus Cordubensis (257 ? - ?)
Details
Ossius episcopus Cordubensis (?) (257 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus episcopus Bitterensis (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus Nolanus (?) (353 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus Nolanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Callinicus (450 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Orosius (380 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Orosius (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Pelagius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Pelagius (350 ? - ?)
Details
Pelagius (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Priscillianus episcopus Abilensis (340 ? - ?)
Details
Proba (322 ? - ?)
Details
Prudentius (348 ? - ?)

Espagnol, avocat, après avoir été un fonctionnaire de l’Empire en Espagne, Prudence renonce à la vie publique vers la fin de sa vie. C’est assurément le plus grand poète de l’Antiquité chrétienne en Occident : ses oeuvres témoignent d’un grand talent et d’une véritable originalité ; elles portent des titres grecs, mais sont écrites en latin et ont été publiées, en 4 volumes, dans la Collection des Universités de France.

Details
Scarila (0 ? - ?)
Details
Secundinus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Sedulius Presbyter (350 ? - ?)

Poète du Ve s.

Details
Severus Antiochenus (?) (465 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi Carthago (250 ? - ?)
Details
Theodosius Alexandrinus (480 ? - ?)

évêque de 535 à 566.

Details
Victor (0 ? - ?)
Details
Victorinus Poeta (150 ? - ?)

rattachement au pôle Gaule incertain

Details
Vrsacius Episcopus Singidunensis (= Valens episcopus Mursensis) (300 ? - ?)

Mésie

Details
Zacharias Papa (700 ? - ?)

741-752

Details
Germinius episcopus Sirmiensis (300 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma Homiliaria (0 ? - ?)
Details
Chromatius episcopus Aquileiensis (?) (340 ? - ?)
Details
Thomas Gallus (1190 ? - ?)

Victorin du XIIIe s.

Details
Abramius Ephesinus (510 ? - ?)

Abraham, archevêque d'Ephèse, est probablement le même, mentionné par Jean Moschos, qui a fondé un monastère à Constantinople et un autre à Jérusalem. L'homélie In annuntiationem, la première à attester une célébration de l'Annonciation le 25 mars, est datée des années 550-553.

Details
Acacius Beroeensis (340 ? - ?)

Ascète, correspondant de Basile et d'Epiphane à qui il demanda d'écrire ce qui devait être le Panarion, Acace (v. 340 - v. 435) fut ordonné évêque de Bérée (Alep) en 378 par Mélèce. À la mort de celui-ci lors du concile de Constantinople I en 381, il ordonna Flavien évêque d'Antioche, ce qui lui valut les foudres du pape Damase. En 403 Jean Chrysostome le récuse comme juge au Synode du Chêne. Sans participer au concile d'Ephèse en 431, il servit de médiateur pour le pacte d'union de 433. Ne restent de lui que six lettres portant sur le débat avec Nestorius.

Details
Acacius Constantinopolitanus (410 ? - ?)

Acace, archevêque de Constantinople de 471 à 489, provoque le schisme dit « acacien » (484-519) après avoir été excommunié et déposé par le pape Félix III. Bien que chalcédonien convaincu, il est en effet l'instigateur de l'Henoticon de l'empereur Zénon en 482, proposant une formule de compromis avec les monophysites. Reste de lui la lettre qu'il écrit au moment de l'Henoticon à Pierre le Foulon, évêque miaphysite d'Antioche.

Details
Acacius Melitenus (350 ? - ?)

Evêque de Mélitène en Euphratésie, Acace s'oppose de façon virulente à Nestorius au concile d'Ephèse (431) ainsi qu'à Jean d'Antioche. Cyrillien pur et dur, il s'en prend notamment aux écrits de Diodore de Tarse et de Théodore de Mopsueste. Reste de lui notamment l'homélie qu'il a prononcée contre Nestorius à Ephèse.

Details
Adomnanus Abbas Hiensis (627 ? - ?)

Né vers 627 en Irlande, Adomnan (ou Adamnan) est abbé d'Iona (en Écosse) de 679 à sa mort en 704. Adoptant la date romaine de Pâque, il contribue à en répandre l'usage en Irlande. Parmi ses ouvrages, outre des pièces de poésie en gaélique, on compte une Vie de saint Colomban, une Loi des innocents et un livre sur Les lieux saints, inspiré notamment des dires d'Arculf.

Details
Aetius Antiochenus (?) (250 ? - ?)
Details
Aetius Presbyter Constantinopolitanus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Agapetus Diaconus Constantinopolitanus (470 ? - ?)

Diacre de l'église Sainte-Sophie à Constantinople, Agapet a dédié à l'empereur Justinien Ier – selon la tradition il aurait été son précepteur –, peu après 527, un Miroir du prince intitulé Ἔκθεσις κεφαλαίων παραινετικῶν, qui, ratttachant la figure du roi de droit divin à l'idéal platonicien, a eu une grande diffusion.

Details
Agathangelus (490 ? - ?)

Agathange est le nom fictif de l'auteur d'une Histoire de l'Arménie relatant l'évangélisation de l'Arménie par Grégoire l'Illuminateur. Le récit se veut contemporain des faits, mais date au moins des années 490.

Details
Alexander Alexandrinus (240 ? - ?)

Alexandre, évêque d'Alexandrie de 312 à sa mort en 328, est connu pour son combat contre la doctrine de l'un des prêtres de son diocèse, Arius.

Details
Alexander Cyprius (450 ? - ?)

Moine chypriote auteur de quelques homélies, Alexandre a peut-être vécu sous Justinien (527-565), mais les hypothèses vont du 5e au 12e siècle.

Details
Alexander Lycopolitanus (300 ? - ?)

Philosophe semi-chrétien (Photios le croit évêque) de Lycopolis, Alexandre a laissé un traité Contre la doctrine de Mani à caractère néoplatonicien.

Details
Alypius Presbyter Ecclesiae Apostolorum (380 ? - ?)

Alypius, prêtre de l'église des Saints-Apôtres à Constantinople au 5e siècle, est l'auteur d'une lettre à Cyrille d'Alexandrie.

Details
Ammon Episcopus (300 ? - ?)

Ermite dans le désert de Nitrie, puis évêque (on ne sait de quel siège), Ammon est l'auteur d'une lettre sur Pachôme et Théodore, adressée à un certain Théophile.

Details
Ammonas (30 ? - ?)

Disciple de saint Antoine, moine à Scété, Ammonas est consacré évêque d'une localité inconnue par Athanase. Quelques apophtegmes lui sont attribués, ainsi que des lettres transmises en différentes langues.

Details
Ammonas (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Ammonas, moine de Scété puis évêque consacré par Athanase (mais le nom est très courant), ont été transmis divers textes ascétiques.

Details
Ammonius (400 ? - ?)

Moine au 5e siècle, cet Ammonius est l'auteur d'un De sanctis patribus barbarorum incursione in monte Sina et Raïthu peremptis.

Details
Ammonius Alexandrinus (400 ? - ?)

Ammonius, auteur alexandrin du 5e ou du 6e siècle, a écrit des commentaires exégétiques.

Details
Ammonius Alexandrinus (Ps.) (650 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Ammonius ont été transmis des fragments sur Matthieu empruntés à divers Pères.

Details
Anastasius Apocrisiarius (590 ? - ?)

Apocrisiaire du pape à Constantinople, Anastase est arrêté à Rome avec Maxime le Confesseur; la main droite et la langue coupées, il meurt en exil dans le Caucase.

Details
Anastasius Discipulus Maximi (390 ? - ?)

Anastase, secrétaire de l'impératrice Eudoxie et disciple de Maxime le Confesseur, qu'il suit pendant plus de 30 ans dans ses tribulations, meurt quelques jours avant lui en 662.

Details
Anastasius I Antiochenus (510 ? - ?)

Apocrisiaire du patriarche d'Alexandrie à Antioche puis patriarche d'Antioche en 559, Anastase s'oppose à l'édit de Justinien sur l'aphtartodocétisme en 565 et est destitué en 570, où il part à Jérusalem. Par l'entremise de son ami Grégoire le Grand il retrouve son siège en 593, qu'il conserve jusqu' à sa mort en 598 ou 599.

Details
Anastasius I Antiochenus (Ps.) (480 ? - ?)

L'auteur de la Discussion religieuse à la cour des Sassanides est anonyme; peut-être son nom est-il caché dans la mention des « Discussions d'Abdodedôrou », forme hellénisée de Abd-Hadad : cf. E. Honigman, Patristic Studies (Studi e Testi 173), Rome 1953, p. 85. Certains manuscrits attribuent, sans vraisemblance, le texte à Anastase, patriarche d'Antioche au VIIe s. L'auteur est en tout état de cause postérieur à sa source principale, Philippe de Sidé (début du Ve siècle), et antérieur à l'expansion de l'Islam (début du VIIe siècle). S'il se présente bien comme chrétien (et, par ailleurs, citoyen romain), il paraît être du moins un converti du paganisme, prônant une paix religieuse non exempte de syncrétisme, plus favorable aux païens qu'aux juifs. Une origine persane semble exclue : les phrases censées être en persan contiennent beaucoup de mots grecs; en tout cas les manuscrits du texte, en désaccord sur un certain nombre de phrases délicates et de noms propres, restent hésitants. De fait, la provenance du texte est discutée : J. Marquart, dans A. Wirth, Aus Orientalischen Chroniken, Francfort 1894, p. 207, propose l'Asie mineure, E. Bratke (p. 207) pense à Antioche ou à Hiérapolis de Syrie, E. Honigman (p. 86) penche plutôt pour Carrhæ, surnommée Hellénopolis (« la cité des païens »).

Details
Anastasius Sinaita (Ps.) (600 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Anastase le Sinaïte ont été transmis divers textes inauthentiques ou incertains.

Details
Anatolius Constantinopolitanus (390 ? - ?)

Né à Alexandrie, ordonné diacre par Cyrille, il est envoyé à Constantinople comme apocrisiaire puis élu patriarche de la capitale en 449. Il soutient le Tome à Flavien et participe au concile de Chalcédoine, mais protège certains eutychiens.

Details
Andreas Caesariensis (500 ? - ?)

Evêque de Césarée de Cappadoce dans la seconde moitié du 6e siècle, André est semble-t-il le premier auteur grec d'un commentaire sur l'Apocalypse.

Details
Andreas Cretensis (Ps.) (650 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'André de Crète ont été transmis divers textes inauthentiques.

Details
Anonyma Scripta Apollinaristica (360 ? - ?)
Details
Anonymi uarii Ariani (300 ? - ?)

Plusieurs textes, mis par exemple sous le nom d'Athanase, de Basile ou de Jean Chrysostome dans les manuscrits, ont été jugés ariens par la critique, sans certitude et sans qu'on puisse facilement préciser leur origine.

Details
Anthimus Trapezuntinus (470 ? - ?)

Evêque de Trébizonde après 518, Anthime devint archevêque de Constantinople après 535. Son soutien à Sévère d'Antioche provoqua sa déposition en 536.

Details
Antiochus Monachus (560 ? - ?)

Antiochus, moine de la Laure de Saint-Sabas, est l'auteur des Pandecta Scripturae sacrae, manuel de morale chrétienne, en 130 chapitres, composé entre 620 et 628 à partir d'extraits de la Bible et des oeuvres de certains Pères de l'Église.

Details
Antonius Hagiographus (470 ? - ?)

L'auteur de la Vie de Syméon l'Ancien, stylite près d'Antioche († 459) se présente comme un disciple de ce Syméon et un témoin diret de sa vie. Mais la critique penche plutôt pour un écrivain constantinopolitain du début du 6e s.

Details
Antonius Magnus Abbas (251 ? - ?)

Antoine le Grand, moine de Thébaïde notamment, est considéré comme le fondateur de l'érémitisme chrétien au IIIe siècle.
C'est sans doute peu après le milieu de ce siècle qu'en Moyenne-Égypte il vend ses biens, en donne le prix aux pauvres et se retire dans le désert, où il vécut, dit-on, jusqu'à l'âge de cent cinq ans. De ses rares écrits authentiques subsistent quelques lettres. La Vie d'Antoine (SC 400) écrite par saint Athanase, qui l'avait connu, contribua beaucoup à révéler celui à qui on a donné le titre de « père des moines ».

Details
Antonius Magnus Abbas (?) (300 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Antoine, on conserve notamment un fragment de lettre dont l'authenticité est incertain.

Details
Antonius Magnus Abbas (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Antoine sont parvenus un certain nombre de lettres, de sermons et de Règles inauthentiques.

Details
Apollinaris Laodicenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Arator Subdiaconus (490 ? - ?)

Sans doute milanais d'origine, Arator fut ordonné sous-diacre par le pape Vigile à Rome entre 535 et 554. Il est connu pour ses poèmes, dont sa métaphrase des Actes des Apôtres.

Details
Arius (260 ? - ?)

Prêtre de l'église de Baucalis à Alexandrie après s'être illustré lors de la persécution de 303-311, Arius fut un disciple de Lucien d'Antioche. En 318 la doctrine subordiantianiste qu'il professe, l'arianisme, fut condamnée par un concile réuni à Alexandrie par l'évêque Alexandre. Popularisant ses idées notamment grâce à des chansons, il obtint de solides appuis, notamment Eusèbe de Nicomédie. Condamné au concile de Nicée en 325, ses idées gagnèrent du terrain. Il allait être réhabilité comme ministre du culte à Constantinople quand, pris de colique, il mourut dans les latrines de l'église en 336.

Details
Arsenius Anachoreta (354 ? - ?)

Arsène aurait été précepteur d'Arcadius et Honorius à Constantinople avant de se retirer comme ermite à Scété vers 394. Parmi les textes qui lui sont attribués, il y a une lettre en géorgien et une quarantaine de logia ou anecdotes dans la collection alphabétique des Apophtegmes.

Details
Asterius Amasenus (300 ? - ?)

Métropolite d’Amasée dans le Pont, contemporain d’Amphiloque et des trois grands Cappadociens. Souvent confondu avec Astérius le Sophiste, on conserve de lui au moins 16 homélies et des panégyriques de martyrs (à éditer).

Details
Asterius Sophista (270 ? - ?)

Cappadocien d'origine, Astérios dit le Sophiste fut l'élève de Lucien d'Antioche. Il fut l'un des grands théoriciens de l'arianisme de la première génération. Ses adversaires disent qu'il aurait apostasié lors de la dernière persécution. Il serait devenu évêque; il participa au concile d'Antioche de 341 et semble avoir nuancé sa position arienne à la fin de sa vie. Jérôme parle de ses commentaires sur les Psaumes (des homélies sur ce livre nous sont parvenues), sur les évangiles et sur l'Epître aux Romains.

Details
Athanasius Anazarbanus (270 ? - ?)

Evêque d'Anazarbe en Syrie, Athanase fut l'un des premiers évêques à soutenir Arius. Bien qu'il fût contraint à souscrire à l'homoousios lors du concile de Nicée, il prêchait un arianisme radical dont témoignent quelques fragments.

Details
Atticus Constantinopolitanus (340 ? - ?)

Né à Sébaste en Arménie, Atticus fut moine en Macédoine, puis à Constantinople où il joua un rôle important dans la cabale contre Jean Chrysostome. En mars 406, quatre mois après la mort d'Arsace, qui avait succédé à Chrysostome en 404, Atticus devint archevêque de Constantinople, siège dont il s'afforça d'étendre le pouvoir. Après la mort de Chrysostome en septembre 407, il fut l'un des acteurs de sa réhabilitation posthume. Il reste de lui quelques lettres et des fragments sur la Trinité.

Details
Basilius archimandrita Constantinopolitanus (370 ? - ?)

D'origine antiochienne mais disciple de Cyrille, diacre et archimandrite à Constantinople, Basile était un adversaire de Nestorius, et il s'en prit aussi à Théodore de Mopsueste et à Diodore de Tarse.

Details
Basilius Seleuciensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Caesarius (Ps.) (500 ? - ?)

Sous le nom de Césaire, frère cadet de Grégoire de Nazianze, nous sont parvenus quatre livres de Questiones et Responsiones, écrit sans doute après la mort de Théodora (548). Il est possible que son auteur ait été un moine du couvent constantinopolitain des Acémètes.

Details
Anonyma (Catenae in Nouum Testamentum) (400 ? - ?)
Details
Anonyma (Catenae in Vetus Testamentum) (400 ? - ?)
Details
Christophorus Alexandrinus (?) (760 ? - ?)

On attribue à Christophe d'Alexandrie (817-841) une Parabola de serpente, attribuée aussi à Hippolyte, Théophile d'Alexandrie, Chrysotome et Photius.

Details
Chrysippus Hierosolymitanus (410 ? - ?)

Cappadocien, il fut un des premiers moines de la Laure de Saint-Euthyme. Vers 456, il fut ordonné prêtre de l'Anastasis à Jérusalem puis, en 466, nommé gardien des reliques de la sainte Croix. Il reste de lui quelques homélies.

Details
Colluthus (500 ? - ?)

Alexandrin, Colluthus écrivit une Apologie de Théodose (patriarche monophysite d'Alexandrie de 525 à 560) adressé au diacre Themisitios, chef de file des agnoètes visés par le Tomus a Theodora de Théodose. Themistios répliqua par un Contre Colluthus.

Details
Concilium Contantinopolitanum IV (869 - ?)
Details
Concilium Ephesinum (431 - ?)
Details
Concilium Nicaenum II (787 - ?)
Details
Concilium Constantinopolitanum III (680 - ?)
Details
Constantinus Diaconus et Chartophylax Constantinopolitanus (550 ? - ?)

Sous le nom de Constantin, diacre et archiviste de Constantinople, est transmis un Eloge de tous les martyrs, cité notamment au concile de Nicée II.

Details
Constantius Presbyter (370 ? - ?)

Les manuscrits de la Correspondance de Jean Chrysostome et les autres sources hésitent entre Constance (Constantios) ou Constantin (Constantinos). Destinataire de plusieurs lettres de l'archevêque en exil, il est également l'auteur des lettres 237 à 241 en PG 51. Prêtre d'Antioche, à la mort de Flavien il aurait pu devenir évêque si Porphyre n'avait intrigué pour l'écarter. Il rejoint Jean à Cucuse en septembre 404, puis retourne à Antioche pour plaider sa cause, mais il échoue et doit s'enfuir à Chypre. Il a pu jouer un rôle dans la publication de la Correspondance de Chrysostome, et peut-être d'autres œuvres.

Details
Andreas Cretensis (?) (650 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'André de Crète ont été transmis des textes d'authenticité incertaine.

Details
Anonyma monastica (300 ? - ?)
Details
Arethas Caesariensis (860 ? - ?)

Disciple de Photios, Aréthas fut évêque de Césarée au début du Xe siècle. Enrichissant la bibliothèque de Césarée, il joua un rôle majeur dans la transmission de beaucoup de textes; on lui doit un certain nombre de manuscrits aujourd'hui, sans parler des scholies avec lesquelles il les agrémentait.

Details
Besa (410 ? - ?)

Besa fut un disciple de Shenoudi et lui succéda vers 455 à la tête d'Athrib, le Monastère Blanc. Il est l'auteur d'une vie de Shenoudi, de lettres et de catéchèses monastiques.

Details
Carour (300 ? - ?)

Carour est un disciple de saint Pacôme dont il reste des fragments coptes.

Details
Constantinus episcopus Urbis Siout (550 ? - ?)

Moine, Constantin devint évêque de Lycopolis (Assiout). Auteur notamment d'éloges d'Athanase et du martyr Claude, c'est l'un des principaux écrivains de la littérature copte.

Details
Constantinus Tiensis (300 ? - ?)

Constantin, évêque de Tium, en Paphlagonie, sur les bords du Pont-Euxin, est l'auteur d'une homélie sur la translation des reliques de Sainte Euphémie (BHG 621).

Details
Cosmas Hierosolymitanus (680 ? - ?)

Orphelin, Cosmas de Jérusalem (dit aussi Cosmas de Maïouma, Cosmas le Mélode ou Cosmas Hagiopolitès) fut d'après la légende adopté par Serge, le père de Jean Damascène. Il devint moine avec lui à Saint-Sabas vers 726, puis en 743 il fut élu évêque de Maïouma dans la région de Gaza. Il est l'auteur de nombreuses hymnes, ainsi que d'un commentaire des Poèmes de Grégoire de Nazianze.

Details
Cosmas Vestitor (740 ? - ?)

Nous ne savons rien de la vie de ce Cosmas « Vestitor », c'est-à-dire serviteur de la garde-robe impériale, auteur notamment de plusieurs écrits de seconde main et de Discours sur Jean Chrysostome.

Details
Cyrillus Hierosolymitanus (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Cyrillus Scythopolitanus (525 ? - ?)

Né à Scythopolis, Cyrille fut moine dans la Laure d'Euthyme en 544, puis à Saint-Sabas en 557. Il est connu pour ses biographies de moines de Palestine.

Details
Cyrus Alexandrinus (560 ? - ?)

Patriarche d'Alexandrie en 430, Cyrus fut un partisan du monothélisme.

Details
Dalmatius archimandrita Constantinopolitanus (340 ? - ?)

Officer de la garde impériale, Dalmace devint moine sur le tard avec son fils Faustus. Il est l'auteur de deux lettres au concile d'Ephèse et d'une apologie.

Details
Daniel Raithenus (600 ? - ?)

Daniel, moine de Raïtha (sur la Mer Rouge) au VIIe s., a écrit une Vie de saint Jean Climaque.

Details
Daniel Scetiota (?) (500 ? - ?)

Une série de récits édifiants sont mis sous le nom de Daniel, peut-être moine de Scété au VIe s., ou portent sur un certain Daniel. L'identité de ce ou de ces personnages n'est pas assurée.

Details
Diadochus Photicensis (Ps.) (400 ? - ?)

On a attribué à Diadoque de Photicé une Catéchèse, mais cette attribution n'est pas assez bien attestée dans les manuscrits.

Details
Dioscorus I Alexandrinus (390 ? - ?)

Archidiacre accompagnant Cyrille à Ephèse en 431, il lui succéda en 444. Il présida Ephèse II en 449, approuvant Eutychès et condamnant Flavien. Déposé à Chalcédoine en 451, il mourut à Gangres en 454.

Details
Anonymus (Epistula de Dorotheo Gazaeo) (570 ? - ?)
Details
Elias Philosophus (500 ? - ?)

Chrétien, disciple du philosophe païen Olympiodore et sans doute de Jean Philopon, Elie était un philosophe de l'école néoplatonicienne d'Alexandrie. La plupart de ses écrits sont des commentaires d'Aristote.

Details
Ephraem Antiochenus (460 ? - ?)

Originaire d'Amid, Ephrem fut comte d'Orient avant de devnir évêque d'Antioche de 527 à 545. Chef de file du parti néochalcédonien sous Justinien, il s'en prit notamment aux disciples de Sévère d'Antioche.

Details
Ephraem Antiochenus (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Ephrem d'Antioche nous sont parvenus plusieurs fragments inauthentiques.

Details
Ephraem Graecus (306 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'«Ephrem grec», l'érudition classe les textes grecs, pour la plupart ascétiques, mis sous le nom d'Ephrem de Nisibe.

Details
Epiphanius diaconus Catanensis (720 ? - ?)

Diacre de Catane en Sicile, Epiphane prononça en 787, au concile de Nicée II, un discours en faveur des images.

Details
Evagrius Antiochenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Evagrius Ponticus (?) (346 ? - ?)
Details
Eudoxius Constantinopolitanus (300 ? - ?)

D'origine arménienne, d'abord évêque de Germanicia, puis, en 357, d'Antioche et enfin, en 360, de Constantinople, Eudoxe a défendu successivement plusieurs partis ariens: eusébiens, anoméens, anoméens modérés.

Details
Eudoxius Constantinopolitanus (?) (300 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Eudoxe, évêque arien d'Antioche puis de Constantinople mort en 370, ont été transmis dans les chaînes des fragments sur Daniel.

Details
Eulogius Alexandrinus (530 ? - ?)

D'origine antiochienne et chalcédonien, Euloge fut évêque d'Alexandrie entre 580 et 607/608.

Details
Eugenius diaconus Ancyranus (300 ? - ?)

Eugène, diacre d'Ancyre, porta à Athanase d'Alexandrie vers 371 une lettre pour défendre Marcel d'Ancyre.

Details
Eunomius Beroensis Apollinarista (300 ? - ?)

Eunome, évêque de Bérée au IVe s., fut un disciple d'Apolinaire de Laodicée. Ne reste de lui qu'une citation dans la Doctrina patrum.

Details
Eunomius Cyzicenus (320 ? - ?)

Of Cappadocian origin, Eunomius was secretary to Aetius, then the Bishop of Cyzicus in 360 and a leader of Anomoeanism, a radical form of Arianism. His First Apology, written in 361, was refuted by Basil of Caesarea in 363-364, which led him to write a Second Apology in 378. In 383 he wrote a Profession of Faith, at the request of Emperor Theodosius. These are the only writings left of his vast literary output.

Details
Euprepius episcopus Palti (300 ? - ?)

Euprepios, évêque de Paltos en Syrie au IVe s., a rédigé un écrit contre les messaliens, adressé à Paulin d'Antioche, dont Sévère d'Antioche a transmis un fragment.

Details
Eusebius Alexandrinus (Ps.) (470 ? - ?)

Comme on ne connaît pas d'Eusèbe sur le siège d'Alexandrie avant le XIe s., la collection de 21 ou 22 homélies grecques transmises sous le nom d'Eusèbe d'Alexandrie n'ont pas d'auteur identifié. Sans doute proche de la région syro-palestinienne, il aurait vécu à la fin du Ve s. et au début du VIe s.

Details
Eusebius Caesariensis (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)

Parmi les spuria d'Eusèbe de Césarée figure un texte Sur l'étoile des mages, transmis en syriaque.

Details
Eusebius Dorylaeus (400 ? - ?)

Rhéteur et avocat à Constantinople, adversaire de Nestorius en 430, Eusèbe est évêque de Dorylée (Phrygie) en 448 quand il s'en prend cette fois-ci à Eutychès. Déposé en 449, il participe au concile de Chalcédoine en 451.

Details
Eusebius Nicomediensis (370 ? - ?)

Arien, disciple de Lucien d'Antioche, évêque de Beyrouth puis de Nicomédie, Eusèbe est exilé peu après le concile de Nicée puis réhabilité en 328. S'acharnant contre Athanase, il est l'un des pricnipaux artisans de la réhabilitation d'Arius en 335; il baptise Constantin sur son lit de mort en 337 et meurt lui-même vers 341-342.

Details
Eustathius Antiochenus (270 ? - ?)

Born at the end of the 3rd century. Bishop of Bere (Aleppo), then of Antioch, he fought Arius and his doctrine, until the Arians succeeded in having him deposed and exiled on grounds of Sabellianism. A schism bore his name (the Eustathians), but did not last. He died (perhaps a long time) after 338.

Details
Eustathius Antiochenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Eustathius episcopus Beryti (380 ? - ?)
Details
Eustathius monachus (1170 ? - ?)
Details
Eustratius Constantinopolitanus (520 ? - ?)
Details
Euthalius diaconus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Eutyches archimandrita Constantinopolitanus (378 ? - ?)
Details
Eutychius Constantinopolitanus (510 ? - ?)
Details
Flavianus Constantinopolitanus (380 ? - ?)
Details
Flavianus I Antiochenus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Flavius Iosephus (37 - ?)
Details
Gelasius Cyzicenus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Gelasius Caesariensis (335 ? - ?)
Details
Gennadius Constantinopolitanus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Alexandrinus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Cyprius (1241 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Laodicenus (280 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Cyprius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Nicomediensis (800 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Pisida (650 ? - ?)
Details
Georgius Nicomediensis (?) (800 ? - ?)
Details
Germanus I Constantinopolitanus (640 ? - ?)

Patriarche de Constantinople, il est le premier adversaire et par la suite victime des iconoclastes, théologien (mariologie) et grand orateur.

Details
Germanus I Constantinopolitanus (?) (650 ? - ?)
Details
Germanus I Constantinopolitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Germanus II Constantinopolitanus (1150 ? - ?)
Details
Gregentius (Ps.) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Agrigentinus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Antiochenus (?) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Antiochenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Presbyter (1100 ? - ?)
Details
Gregorius Thaumaturgus (Ps.) (200 ? - ?)
Details
Hareth Patricius (500 ? - ?)
Details
Hegemonius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Heraclianus Chalcedonensis (0 ? - ?)
Details
Hesychius Hierosolymitanus (?) (400 ? - ?)
Details
Hesychius Milesius (500 ? - ?)
Details
Hesychius Sinaita (600 ? - ?)
Details
Hippolytus Thebanus (650 ? - ?)
Details
Hippolytus Thebanus (?) (650 ? - ?)
Details
Hippolytus Thebanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Historia Monachorum (0 ? - ?)
Details
Hypatius Ephesinus (470 ? - ?)
Details
Hyperechius (300 ? - ?)
Details
Iacobus Baradeus (480 ? - ?)
Details
Iacobus Iudaeus (Ps.) (600 ? - ?)
Details
Ignatius Antiochenus (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)

L'auteur qui a interpolé les 7 lettres authentiques d'Ignace à la fin du 4e siècle est souvent assimilé à Julien l'Arien, auteur des Constitutions Apostoliques.

Details
Ignatius diaconus Constantinopolitanus (750 ? - ?)
Details
Iobius Apollinarista (350 ? - ?)
Details
Iobius monachus (450 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Beth-Aphthoniensis (475 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Caesariensis (450 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Carpathius (600 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Climacus (Ps.) (570 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Damascenus (?) (650 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Damascenus (Ps.) (650 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes episcopus Cellarum (500 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Euboeensis (700 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes I Thessalonicensis (550 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes II Cappadoces (450 ? - ?)

Fut patriarche de Constantinople de 518 à 520.

Details
Iohannes III Scholasticus patriarcha Const. (500 ? - ?)

Patriarche de 565 à 577.

Details
Iohannes IV Ieiunator (500 ? - ?)

patriarche de CP 582-595

Details
Iohannes IV Papa (580 ? - ?)

Pape de 640 à 642.
Sa Lettre à Constantin III est de 641.

Details
Iohannes Moschus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes Philoponus (475 ? - ?)

Grammairien et philosophe chrétien monophysite, né à Alexandrie (Égypte). Jean Philopon fut le disciple et l'assistant du philosophe Ammonios. C'est en utilisant des notes prises pendant les cours de son maître qu'il publia à partir de 517 plusieurs Commentaires sur les œuvres d'Aristote. Il publia également de nombreux ouvrages consacrés à la théologie, à l'exégèse biblique, à la philosophie, à la grammaire, aux mathématiques et à la science.

Details
Iohannes Raithenus Abbas (550 ? - ?)

Abbé du monastère de Raïthou, demande à Jean Climaque d'écrire L'échelle du Paradis.

Details
Iohannes Rufus (440 ? - ?)

Evêque monophysite de Maïouma après Pierre l'bère.

Details
Iohannes Scythopolitanus (450 ? - ?)
Details
Iosephus Hymnographus (816 ? - ?)
Details
Iosephus Thessalonicensis (760 ? - ?)
Details
Iosipus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Irenaeus Comes (380 ? - ?)
Details
Isaac Ninivita (?) (600 ? - ?)
Details
Isaac Ninivita (620 ? - ?)
Details
Iulianus Apollinarista (330 ? - ?)
Details
Iulianus Arianus (300 ? - ?)

Serait l'auteur des lettres du pseudo-Ignace (recension longue), des Constitutions apostoliques, et du Commentaire sur Job.

Details
Iulianus Halicarnassensis (450 ? - ?)
Details
Iustinianus Imperator (483 - ?)
Details
Leontius Byzantinus (480 ? - ?)

A priest of Constantinople in the second half of the 5th century, Leontius left a few homilies, some of which were transmitted under the name of John Chrysostom.

Details
Leontius Neapolitanus (590 ? - ?)
Details
Leontius Romanus (550 ? - ?)
Details
Leontius Sabaita (700 ? - ?)
Details
Leontius Scholasticus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Longinus episcopus Nubiorum (500 ? - ?)
Details
Lucius Alexandrinus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Macarius Alexandrinus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Macarius Antiochenus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Macarius Magnes (350 ? - ?)
Details
Macarius/Symeon (Ps.) (350 ? - ?)

Documents téléchargeables en ligne :

Details
Marcellus Ancyranus (?) (270 ? - ?)
Details
Marcellus Ancyranus (Ps.) (270 ? - ?)
Details
Marcianus (?) (200 ? - ?)
Details
Marcianus asceta (300 ? - ?)
Details
Marcus diaconus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Marcus Diadochus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Maximianus Constantinopolitanus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Maximus Confessor (Ps.) (600 ? - ?)
Details
Menas Constantinopolitanus (460 ? - ?)
Details
Methodius Constantinopolitanus (Ps.) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Methodius II Constantinopolitanus (1140 ? - ?)
Details
Metrophanes monachus (900 ? - ?)
Details
Michael Psellus (1018 - ?)
Details
Michael Syncellus (761 - ?)
Details
Miltiades Apologeta (100 ? - ?)
Details
Modestus Hierosolymitanus (Ps.) (650 ? - ?)
Details
Naucratius Studites (770 ? - ?)
Details
Nectarius Constantinopolitanus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Nestorius Constantinopolitanus (381 ? - ?)

Patriarche de Constantinople du 10 avril 428 au 11 juillet 431,.mort en exil en Égypte en 451.

Details
Nestorius Constantinopolitanus (?) (381 ? - ?)
Details
Nestorius Constantinopolitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Nicephorus I Constantinopolitanus (758 ? - ?)
Details
Nicetas diaconus (1030 ? - ?)
Details
Nilus Ancyranus (?) (330 ? - ?)
Details
Nilus Ancyranus (Ps.) (330 ? - ?)
Details
Nonnus Panopolitanus (380 ? - ?)
Details
Nonnus Panopolitanus (Ps.) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Oecumenius (600 ? - ?)
Details
Olympiodorus diaconus Alexandrinus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Olympiodorus diaconus Alexandrinus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Orsiesius (280 ? - ?)
Details
Orsiesius (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Pachomius Tabennensis (292 ? - ?)

S. Pachôme, qui avait d'abord vécu en solitaire dans les premières années du IVe siècle, fut l'initiateur, à Tabennisi, en Haute-Égypte, du monachisme cénobitique, c'est-à-dire d'une vie religieuse vécue en communauté, par des hommes ou par des femmes, selon un rythme quotidien régulier, dans un monastère très organisé et hiérarchisé.

Details
Pachomius Tabennensis (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Pamphilus Theologus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Pantoleon presbyter Byzantinus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Paulinus Tyrius (300 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Antiochenus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Emesenus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus II Constantinopolitanus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus II Constantinopolitanus (?) (600 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Persa (500 ? - ?)

Paul le Perse, auteur d'un traité sur la logique d'Aristote, qui vécut au temps du patriarche nestorien Ezechiel (567-580), désireux de devenir évêque de Persis et finalement converti au zoroastrisme, est-il à identifier avec l'auteur ecclésiastique Paul le Perse qui rapporte un débat avec Photin le Manichéen, débat qui se serait tenu à Constantinople en 527 et a été édité par Mai ?

Details
Paulus Samosatenus (Ps.) (220 ? - ?)
Details
Paulus Silentiarius (500 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus episcopus Myrorum (400 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus II Alexandrinus (320 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus II Alexandrinus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus III Alexandrinus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Petrus Sebastenus (320 ? - ?)

Born around 340, Peter of Sebaste was the younger brother of Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa. Macrina, his elder sister, took charge of his education and initiated him into the ascetic life. Around 370, he was ordained priest. Together with his sister, he was responsible for their cenobitic community and showed remarkable charity in times of famine. After 380, he became bishop of Sebaste in Armenia and supported his brothers in their fight against Arianism. He probably died in 391.

Details
Philippus Sidensis (350 ? - ?)
Details
Philo Carpasianus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Philotheus monachus (1300 ? - ?)
Details
Photius Constantinopolitanus (810 ? - ?)

Photius, born around 810, is one of the main figures of the Byzantine period. He was twice Patriarch of Constantinople (857-867 and 878-886) and died around 895. He is particularly notable as the author of the Bibliotheca or Myriobiblion, composed before his accession to the Patriarchate, which contains about 300 works of Greek literature, some of which are known only through him. He provided reading notes and sometimes lengthy quotations. For instance, he has preserved the summary of the Acts of the Synod of the Oak (no. 59), published in SC 342.

Details
Photius Constantinopolitanus (?) (800 ? - ?)
Details
Pionius Smyrnensis (Ps.) (250 ? - ?)
Details
Polemon Apollinarista (300 ? - ?)
Details
Polychronius Apameensis (330 ? - ?)
Details
Polychronius Apameensis (?) (330 ? - ?)
Details
Proclus Constantinopolitanus (390 ? - ?)
Details
Proclus Constantinopolitanus (?) (400 ? - ?)
Details
Proclus Constantinopolitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Procopius Caesariensis (500 ? - ?)
Details
Procopius diaconus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Pyrrhus Constantinopolitanus (600 ? - ?)
Details
Quintianus episcopus Asculi (Ps.) (450 ? - ?)
Details
Sabbas monachus (450 ? - ?)
Details
Serapion Thmuitanus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Serapion Thmuitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Sergius Constantinopolitanus (560 ? - ?)

Cf. F. CARClONE. Sergio di Costantinopoli ed Onorio I nella controversia monotelita dei VII secolo (Collana "Ecclesia Mater"4), Roma, 1985.

Details
Sergius Constantinopolitanus (?) (560 ? - ?)
Details
Sergius grammaticus (460 ? - ?)
Details
Severianus Gabalensis (?) (370 ? - ?)
Details
Severus Antiochenus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Shenoute (370 ? - ?)

Moine et abbé en Thébaïde ; un des personnages importants du monachisme égyptien, écrivain copte : Lettres et Homélies.

Details
Socrates Scholasticus (380 ? - ?)
Details
Sophronius Hierosolymitanus (?) (550 ? - ?)
Details
Sophronius Hierosolymitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Stephanus diaconus Constantinopolitanus (750 ? - ?)

Auteur en 808 d'une Vie d'Etienne le Jeune, du Mont St Auxence près de Nicomédie, martyr du culte des images

Details
Stephanus episcopus Heracleopolis (550 ? - ?)
Details
Stephanus episcopus Hirapolis Euphratensis (550 ? - ?)

Auteur d'un traité contre les Agnoètes, peut-être à identifier avec l'auteur de la Vie de la martyre perse Golianduch, conservée en géorgien.

Details
Strategius (570 ? - ?)

Témoin de la prise de Jérusalem par les Perses en 614. Auteur à identifier peut-être avec Antiochus le Pandecte, moine de Mar Saba, né près d'Ancyre.

Details
Successus episcopus Diocaesareae (360 ? - ?)
Details
Sulpicius Severus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Symeon Stylita Iunior (521 - ?)
Details
Synesius Cyrenensis (370 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Carthago) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Constantinopolis) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Hierosolyma) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Ancyra) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Gangra) (240 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Antiochia) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Laodicea) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Neocaesarea) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Roma) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Synodi (Sardica) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Tarasius Constantinopolitanus (740 ? - ?)

Patriarche de Constantinople (784-806)

Details
Thallasius abbas (600 ? - ?)
Details
Themistius diaconus Alexandrinus (470 ? - ?)
Details
Theodoretus episcopus Alexandriae (520 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus episcopus Trimithuntis (1000 ? - ?)

Auteur d'une Vie de Jean Chrysostome

Details
Theodorus Abou Qura (750 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Anagnostes (450 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Bestos (750 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Bostrensis (550 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Heracleensis (250 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Hierosolymitanus (800 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Paphi episcopus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Raithenus (520 ? - ?)

Moine au Sinaï, puis évêque de Pharan en Arabie, défenseur du monoénergisme.

Details
Theodorus Scythopolitanus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Theodorus Tabennensis monachus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Theodosius (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodosius I Imperator (347 - ?)

Theodosius I, known as "the Great", Roman Emperor, was born in 347 near present-day Segovia (Spain). Born into a Nicene Christian family, he had a fine military career following in his father's footsteps and particularly distinguished himself against the Sarmatians in 374. Proclaimed emperor in 379, he reigned over the East, Macedonia and Dacia. With the aim of stabilising the borders of the North and the East, he fought the Goths, with whom he concluded a controversial peace treaty in 382, and another with the Sassanians in 387. Together with Gratian, he was the author of the Edict of Thessalonica in 380, which marked the triumph of Nicene Christianity over Arianism. In April 390, having ordered a very bloody repression in Thessalonica, Theodosius was excommunicated by Bishop Ambrose of Milan, and finally agreed to do penance to obtain his reintegration into the Church. He reigned until his death on 17 January 395.

Details
Theodotus Ancyranus (350 ? - ?)
Details
Theodotus Ancyranus (?) (350 ? - ?)
Details
Theodotus Ancyranus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Theodulus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Theognius Nicaenus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Theognius presbyter Hierosolymitanus (400 ? - ?)
Details
Theognostus monachus (800 ? - ?)
Details
Theophilus Alexandrinus (300 ? - ?)
Details
Theophilus Alexandrinus (?) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Theophylactus Bulgarorum archiepiscopus (Theophylactus Achridiensis) (1050 ? - ?)

Identique à Théophylacte d'Achrida

Details
Theotecnus episcopus Liuiadis In Palaestina (500 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus Aelurus (Ps.) (420 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus Apollinarista (320 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus Hierosolymitanus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus Hierosolymitanus (?) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus I Alexandrinus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus I Alexandrinus (?) (500 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus II Alexandrinus Aelurus (420 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus IV episcopus Alexandriae (470 ? - ?)
Details
Timotheus presbyter Constantinopolitanus (470 ? - ?)
Details
Titus Bostrensis (300 ? - ?)
Details
Titus Bostrensis (Ps.) (300 ? - ?)
Details
Valentinus Apollinarista (300 ? - ?)
Details
Zacharias Rhetor (460 ? - ?)
Details
Zacharias Rhetor (?) (460 ? - ?)
Details
Acacius Caesariensis (300 ? - ?)

Successeur d'Eusèbe comme évêque de Césarée de Palestine en 340, Acace est un homéen modéré. En 343 il est au concile de Sardique. Vers 350 il favorise l'accession de Cyrille au siège de Jérusalem, avant de le faire déposer. Appuyé par d'autres évêques (les « acaciens »), en 359, au concile de Séleucie il s'oppose en vain à la tendance homéousienne en proposant une formule homéenne. Gagnant en influence auprès de Constance, il place Mélèce sur le siège d'Antioche en 360 et suit les méandres de la position doctrinale dominante. Il meurt vers 365. Jérôme mentionne son souci de conserver la bibliothèque d'Origène, ainsi, notamment, que son Commentaire de l'Ecclésiaste en 17 livres et ses Questions diverses en six livres. Il ne reste que des fragments.

Details
Michael monachus (0 ? - ?)
Details
Oecumenius (Ps.) (600 ? - ?)
Details
Gennadius Constantinopolitanus (Ps.) (0 ? - ?)
Details
Nicephorus I Constantinopolitanus ? (760 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes episcopus cellarum (500 - ?)

A peu près rien ...

Details
Alexander Alexandrinus (?) (250 ? - ?)

Sous le nom d'Alexandre d'Alexandrie est transmise une homélie Sur l'âme et le corps et sur la passion du Seigneur dont l'authenticité est contestée.

Details
Anonyma (Scholia in Gregorium Nazianzenum) (400 ? - ?)
Details
Rusticus (455 ? - ?)
Details
Iohannes I Thessalonicensis (?) (530 ? - ?)
Details
Symeon Thessalonicus (1350 ? - ?)
Details
Victor Antiochenus (500 ? - ?)
Details
Vitalis Apolinarista (300 ? - ?)

Cf. : H. LIETZMANN. Apollinaris von Laodicea und seine Schule. Texte und Untersuchungen J. Tübingen, 1904. p. 152 s.

Details
Zacharia Hierosolymitanus (550 ? - ?)
Details
Dionysius bar Salibi (1100 ? - ?)
Details
Moyses bar Cephas (813 ? - ?)
Details
Claudianus Mamertus (425 ? - ?)

Prêtre à Vienne, auteur d'un De statu animae, dans la ligne augustinienne et néoplatonicienne.

Details
Petrus Venerabilis (1092 ? - ?)

Neuvième abbé de Cluny.

Details
Columbanus (540 ? - ?)
Details
Osbertus Clarensis (1100 ? - ?)
Details
Lotharius Anagninus (1160 ? - ?)
Details
Sedulius (800 ? - ?)

Ve siècle

Details
Martyrios (Ps.) (360 ? - ?)
Details
Gennadius Presbyter Massiliensis (400 ? - ?)

Gennade, prêtre du clergé de Marseille (après avoir été moine à l'abbaye de Saint-Victor ?), était vraisemblablement d'origine grecque (peut-être même savait-il le syriaque). Son oeuvre est avant tout celle d'un historiographe (par la continuation du De viris illustribus de saint Jérôme), d'un théologien polémiste (traités divers contre Eutychès, Nestorius, Pélage, tous perdus, — ouvrage en huit livres Adversus omnes haereses, dont il reste sans doute quelques fragments sous le titre De ecclesiasticis dogmatibus) et d'un compilateur. Il est probablement aussi l'auteur d'un recueil juridique très important, les Statuta ecclesiae antiqua.

Details
Dadisho’ Qatraya (600 ? - ?)

Moine, puis « reclus », originaire du Bet Qatraye (Qatar), sur le Golfe Persique, nestorien, l’un des meilleurs auteurs de langue syriaque de la seconde moitié du VIIe siècle. La spiritualité de ce défenseur de la vie solitaire porte ouvertement la marque de l’influence d’Évagre le Pontique. Son oeuvre majeure, le Commentaire du livre d’Abba Isaïe, a été éditée et traduite dans le CSCO (n° 326-327) ; son Commentaire sur le Paradis des Pères est en préparation pour SC.

Details
Iohannes Salisberiensis (1115 ? - ?)

Anglais, un grand humaniste chrétien et un personnage central pour son époque, ami de saint Thomas Becket, il devint évêque de Chartres († 1180) ; sa Correspondance est du plus grand intérêt.

Details
Bonaventura (1217 ? - ?)

Philosophe, théologien, exégète, prédicateur illustre, religieux de la famille franciscaine et cardinal, il a laissé une oeuvre abondante et variée. Mort à Lyon.

Details
Iohannes Malalas (490 ? - ?)
Details
Ionas Bobbiensis (600 ? - ?)
Details
Zosimas
Details
Alexander of Hierapolis
Death date